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Hello!

I would like to help with these two sentences:

I leave tonight.

I'm leaving tonight.

I am not sure but I think that there is a difference that in the first sentence somebody could plan it for me and the second sentence can be that it's my decision. Is it right?

And what about these sentences???

I'm going to leave tonight.

I will leave tonight.

Thank you very much...
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Hi Petulinka,

I leave tonight.

I'm leaving tonight.

I am not sure but I think that there is a difference that in the first sentence somebody could plan it for me and the second sentence can be that it's my decision. Is it right? Generally speaking, yes.

I'm going to leave tonight. I'm telling you about my plan.

I will leave tonight. Think of this as 'future with no plan'. It can cover a number of situations, eg a sudden, impromptu statement or a strong expression of determination, of will.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thanks for the reference Teo. It's a very nice analysis and summary.

To tell you the truth though, most native speakers will know how to properly use the correct form depending on the particular circumstances. But most won't be able to explain it!!!
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Thank you, Clive...Emotion: wink
Human subjects

1. She's going to leave tomorrow. [Already decided, but still open to change.]

2. She's leaving tomorrow. [Already arranged but perhaps open to change.]

3. She leaves tomorrow. [Already arranged and not really open to change.]

4. She's to leave tomorrow. [Already arranged, probably not by the subject.]

Quoted from Ways to Grammar, by John Shepherd, Richard Rossner, and James Taylor.
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 Danyoo's reply was promoted to an answer.