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Hello,

Is present simple used for future only when talking about scheduled events in the near future? Would you use present simple in these situations?

Do you come tonight/in three days?

Do you come to the cinema later?

They don't come to the party tomorrow.

Do you play tennis this Sunday?

You don't go out later.

I don't work tonight.

Thanks
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Your sentences are unlikely, but possible. The first, for example, could imply, "Are you scheduled to come tonight?"or "Is tonight the evening of the day of the week when you normally come?"
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I don't think the present simple is used for future events, but we use present continuous or future tense to express future events.

Will you come tonight?

Are you going to join us?

They won't come to the party tomorrow.

Are you going to play tennis this Sunday?

I'm not going to work tonight.
AnonymousI don't think the present simple is used for future events, but we use present continuous or future tense to express future events.
The present simple is not infrequently used for future events, as any grammar book will tell you.
Yes you said right. But how can we distinguish the future and present tense? And how do we use them correctly?

I heard someone who said like this:

The train leaves at five.

What if I use future tense?

The train will leave at five.

What's the difference?
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There is, in practice n difference.

The person who uses the present tense is perhaps seeing the train's departure mentally as a scheduled event. The person who uses WILL may be announcing the certainty of a future event just discovered..

The present simple is more likely in most situations, in my opinion. We are not normally interested in the futurity (we know that), but in the scheduled time.