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When I woould like to tell the story about something whate tense should I use? Present Simple?

When I would like to ask a few questions concerning this story and referring to some pictures related to the story? Should I use Present Simple or Present Continuous? When describing pictures usually Present Continuous is used.
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The past (simple) is the most usual tense for story telling.

The present continuous seems most appropriate for describing or for asking for a description of a picture related to a story.

CJ
So when telling the story should I use present continuous? How about this one: Katie, Tom, Alex follow the footprints, they meet Little Red Riding Hood... here present simpel is used
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So when telling the story should I use present continuous?

I don't know how you can come to that conclusion when I just said that the past simple is the usual tense for telling a story.

In beginners' texts, when the students have not yet learned the past tense, stories are sometimes told in the present simple or present continuous, but this is done simply as a learning device.

CJ
CalifJimI just said that the past simple is the usual tense for telling a story.
Take note of what CJ says.

I wrote my second book in present continuous in the hope that it would resound with some movie producers. Suffice it to say I was beaten to a pulp by the critics.
Hi, Calif.

Do you agree with the following paragraph?

"Present tenses are often used informally to tell stories. The simple present is used for the events - the things that happen one after another. The present progressive is used for "background" - things that are already happening when the story starts, or that continue through the story.

The simple present is common in summaries of plays, stories, etc."

(from Michael Swan, Practical English Usage, Oxford).

Regards.

JK
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Do you agree with the following paragraph? ...

It is true that the present can be used to make a story seem more vivid in the telling, and this is sometimes done in casual speech, but I would consider it an exceptional practice, not the usual way that events in the past are related.

That the present is common in making summaries of artistic works is only relevant to the original question insofar as it applies to descriptions of pictures, which I mentioned in a previous post.

CJ