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Hi all,

1. Here is a sentence taken from the Total Guitar magazine :

"As always we're assuming no previous knowlegde..."

Why the writer used "assuming" instead of "assume" ? Is there any difference in meaning ?

2. Which use of "watch" is correct ? (maybe both ?)

a) I watched Ann performing on stage.

b) I watched Ann perform on stage.

Is there ANY difference in meaning between these two ?

3. The same thing but in the present tenses... so again which one is okey, and why ? Is there any difference in meaning ?

a) I'm watching Ann performing on stage.

b) I watch Ann performing on stage.

c) I'm watching Ann perform on stage.

Thanks, best wishes,
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Here's a slightly different view, for what it's worth:

1. The use of the present continuous (or progressive) makes the "assuming" seem more immediate and friendly. "We assume" would have a rather lofty sound.

2. Both are correct. "Performing" gives a sense of the performance in progress; "perform" gives a sense of the performance as a whole.

3. The first and third options would be used if you were at the performance, and telling someone on your mobile phone what you were doing. Since both use the present progressive "watching", there isn't a great deal of difference; though maybe option A is slightly more immediate. Option B has a literary quality: it might be used in a novel. Or perhaps if someone asked you, "what do you do on Sunday evenings?", you might reply "I watch Ann performing on stage" (i.e. it might denote a habitual action).

MrP
Comments  
Forum_mailHi all,

1. Here is a sentence taken from the Total Guitar magazine :

"As always we're assuming no previous knowlegde..."

Why the writer used "assuming" instead of "assume" ? Is there any difference in meaning ?

I don't think there is enough of a difference to matter. Obviously, "assuming" is ongoing. I'd like to hear the rest of the sentence to put it into a better context.

Forum_mail2. Which use of "watch" is correct ? (maybe both ?)
a) I watched Ann performing on stage.

b) I watched Ann perform on stage.

Is there ANY difference in meaning between these two ?

Technically, a) would indicate that you are in the process of watching Ann (though I would change "watched" to "am watching," perhaps), while b) would indicate that you already watched her.
That being said, I would entirely change a) to "I am watching Ann perform on stage."

Forum_mail3. The same thing but in the present tenses... so again which one is okey, and why ? Is there any difference in meaning ?
a) I'm watching Ann performing on stage.

b) I watch Ann performing on stage.

c) I'm watching Ann perform on stage.

As far as what's most comfortable, I think that here in the States, we would be most likely to say c) to indicate that the situation is ongoing. Emotion: smile

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 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.
MrPedantic 1. The use of the present continuous (or progressive) makes the "assuming" seem more immediate and friendly. "We assume" would have a rather lofty sound.

Good call, MrP.
There is a tone shift, with "assuming" being far less formal.