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Dear teachers,

Would you please tell me which choice of tense is correct or preferable here and why?

You can dive into the water. I (1 watch) you while you (2 swim) in the lake, then I (3 drive) you home whenever you (4 need).

I (1) (a) will / (b) am going to watch you while you (2) (a) swim / (b) are swimming in the lake, then
I (3) (a) will / (b) am going to drive you home whenever you (4) need.

Thank you in advance
Hela
Comments  
This sounds OK to me.
You can dive into the water. I will watch you while you swim in the lake, then I will drive you home whenever you need.
Dear teacher,

Could you please tell me for what reason we have to use the simple future + simple present and not:

a) I'll watch you while you are swimming
b) I am going to watch you while you are swimming
c) I'll be watching you while you are swimming

Thanks again
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Hi
You are expressing your intention and that is why it is simple present.
Look at this situation:
You are in the swimming pool. The person is about to swim. Then you can say,
"I'll watch you while you are swimming.."

It is the context which decides the use of a tense. Sometimes more than one tense fits a place. Further the context is seen in different ways by different people.
Hello,

So these combinations for this sentence are correct:

1) I will watch you while you a) swim OR b) are swimming
2) I am going to watch you while you a) swim OR b) are swimming

but not:
3) I will be watching you while you a) swim OR b) are swimming ?

All the best
HelaI (1 watch) you while you (2 swim) in the lake, then I (3 drive) you home whenever you (4 need).
I'll watch [ because you haven't dived in yet / it's a future event / diving isn't planned or scheduled event so it's not 'going to' ]
you while you swim [because 'while' forces a continuous reading on 'swim' anyway, so 'are swimming' is unnecessary / also 'are swimming' can mean at the moment I'm speaking, and you haven't dived in and begun to swim yet, so you really aren't swimming yet]
in the lake, then I'll drive [this is clearly future / 'am going to' suggests a plan or schedule, and this is just 'whenever']
you home whenever you need. [ I would have ended with 'want', but in any case, 'need' is a non-progressive verb, so 'are needing' is out of the question]

CJ
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Thank you, CJ.

Suresh