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Before the decade is over, David has sent Mike's discovery over to researches and scientists for testing.

I heard the following sentence on a documentary (names have been changed).

When and why would we use the above tenses?

Thanks
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Avangi: could I suggest that you recommend the poster substitute 'fact' for 'habitual action'.

The Earth is round.
This is not a habit/ an habitual action - it is a fact.

I floss my teeth.
I either do, or I don't - statement of fact: I did in the past, I do now, and I will continue to do so in the future
AvangiI was afraid you were going to complain about my "Jack" examples expressing habitual behavior

I thought about it.. But I thought my post was long and boring enough without further words...
Avangi("Habituality" scares the heck out of me.)
At least you're honest. I have some habits that scare the bajeeze's out of me too.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi, Terry,
I think English's term "normal verbs" is a bit broad. I don't think he means to include "to be."

But I think "I floss my teeth" describes "habitual behavior" as commonly used on EF, or as I've learned this morning, "habituation," or habituating. Or was it "habitualization"? I have to open another browser in order to look back at page one, else I'll lose my post. No seria muy grande la perdida.
Before the decade is over, David has sent Mike's discovery over to researches and scientists for testing.

The writer is using Commentary/Historical Present to describe events in the past. Thus, the use of Present tense in "Before the decade is over..."

David becomes aware of Mike's discovery at point A in time. Somewhere between A and the end of the decade over a period of time David sends it to scientists.
BUT - there are two ways of expressing this:

..., David sends Mike's discovery over...

This simply refers to a fact - he either does or doesn't send it, and this happens at point B, somewhere between point A and the end of the decade.

So - what does it indicate to the reader, that the writer switches from Present tense to Present Perfect?
1. the writer is skipping over that decade, so that he is now looking back on that decade as being 'past', and so has moved to NOW, a point in time later than both events from which he wishes to continue his narrative:

Before the decade is over(Historical Present), David has sent (Present Perfect) Mike's discovery over to researches and scientists for testing. They immediately recognize (return to Historical Present, but at a much later new point in time) the world-shattering nature of...

Remember, Present Tense and Past Tense are devoid of any time scale or constraints. They indicate facts, and a fact is devoid of time: it is either true or not true - it either was true, but is now no longer true.
AvangiI don't think he means to include "to be."
That's right.

Below is the link for the definition of normal verbs, mixed verbs, and non-continuous verbs.

http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/types.html
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Wasn't that what I said? Emotion: embarrassed
Thanks for the link. Do you find these categories useful?

There are so many ways to categorize verbs. "Normal" seems exceptionally useless.
Terryxpress
This simply refers to a fact - he either does or doesn't send it, and this happens at point B, somewhere between point A and the end of the decade.

So - what does it indicate to the reader, that the writer switches from Present tense to Present Perfect?

1. the writer is skipping over that decade, so that he is now looking back on that decade as being 'past', and so has moved to NOW, a point in time later than both events from which he wishes to continue his narrative:

Before the decade is over(Historical Present), David has sent (Present Perfect) Mike's discovery over to researches and scientists for testing. They immediately recognize (return to Historical Present, but at a much later new point in time) the world-shattering nature of...

Remember, Present Tense and Past Tense are devoid of any time scale or constraints. They indicate facts, and a fact is devoid of time: it is either true or not true - it either was true, but is now no longer true.


Hi,

Thank you for your clear and logical response. However, here is another way to look at it:

The present tense isn't used to express a fact here, but instead is used to express something that happened in the past. I've read that the simple present can be used in narratives.

What do you think about this interpretation for the use of "David sends"?
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Avangi Do you find these categories useful?

I did wholeheartedly. Now, I'm not so sure.

They were good for me to understand verb tenses better. I previously thought the simple present could express something happening now: I walk here, I sing at School, etc. After learning these categories, however, I discovered that normal verbs, such as walk and sing, need to be in the continuous tense to express something happening right now. This was all straight foward... until this topic sentence cropped up.
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