+0
Before the decade is over, David has sent Mike's discovery over to researches and scientists for testing.

I heard the following sentence on a documentary (names have been changed).

When and why would we use the above tenses?

Thanks
1 2 3
Comments  
I heard the following sentence on a documentary.

You heard it on TV, on radio, but you heard it in a documentary.

What is your reasoning on the tenses?
This is a narrative style very common on documentaries. It's used to give currency to the story.

Sorry, Terry - "in." Emotion: embarrassed
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks.

Why is the present perfect used? Why not the present simple?

Before the decade is over, David has sent Mike's discovery over to researches and scientists for testing.
English 1b3 Why is the present perfect used? Why not the present simple?

Before the decade is over, David has sent Mike's discovery over to researches and scientists for testing. It's analogous to past perfect. It shows completion, but the reference event is in the present.
Hi, again

Before the decade is over, David sends Mike's discovery over to researches and scientists for testing.

And is this grammatical? Normal verbs (that is, verbs that are not non-continuous) usually require the present progressive tense to show an action happening now.

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Your blue version is indeed grammatical.

Do you really want to "show an action happening now"? How long does it take to send something?

There may be a legitimate issue regarding when a present perfect event actually happens. I guess conventional wisdom is that it happened in the very recent past. But I don't think everyone agrees.

I think in this case the present perfect merely shows completion at some time in the present.

I mean, geez, you can describe two consecutive events in the same present tense by using the appropriate adverbials.
Before Jack shaves, he brushes his teeth.
After Jack shaves, he takes a shower.
Before Jack leaves the bathroom, he has used up all the hot water.
By the time he leaves the bathroom, Jack has used up all the hot water.
AvangiDo you really want to "show an action happening now"?
Well, not in this sentence. I'm not concerned with this particular sentence--it's just an example.

------

  • It's just that I've been told that normal verbs (I assume you are familiar with this terminology) in the simple present express habituality: I kill. I walk home from Shcool. I play with my friend Zac.
  • And if we want normal verbs to express an action happening right now, we have to use the present continuous.
Therefore, based on the above points, the sentence is wrong... But we know it is fine. So my question is, what is special about this sentence that makes the use of the simple present to express an action happening right now acceptable?
Hmmmm. I was afraid you were going to complain about my "Jack" examples expressing habitual behavior. ("Habituality" scares the heck out of me.)

My impression is that you need to shift gears for this documentary/narrative style.

We say things like, "finding the door locked, he will enter through the window." Even if you use the simple present, "he enters through the window," it would sound like habitual behavior if we didn't know it to be a narrative.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more