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Present tense can be used to refer to:

Habitual/ Present event
Where do you work?
Do I go now?

Future scheduled event
When do we start work?
When does the train leaves?

A: I'm here to collect my uniform.
B: You are at the wrong location.
A: Where do I collect it?

This usage of present tense in such a context does not refer to the present or future scheduled event. However, it sounds okay. Is it correct?
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dimsumexpress
Anonymous"When does this train leave?"
Anonymous"When do I start work?".
No, this is no reference of future events. If you use "will" instead of "does" and "do ", then yes, it is a question suggesting future time.

The train leaves tomorrow at 3pm (Future)

You start work on Monday (Future)

(Both examples of the commonly used Present Simple for future scheduled events)

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AnonymousA: I'm here to collect my uniform.
B: You are at the wrong location.
A: Where do I collect it?

This usage of present tense in such a context does not refer to the present or future scheduled event. However, it sounds okay. Is it correct?
Future, but not scheduled. You are correct. And it sounds fine to me, too. It's correct. (Your list of only two uses of the simple present needs to be expanded to include other uses.)

Here the present tense has a meaning like should or supposed to. The present can be used when explaining how to perform procedures correctly (or when asking about how to do them).

I've finished the shelving and filing. What do I do next?
First you add the salt. Then you add the pepper.
I've never been here before. I need to pay my water bill. Which desk do I go to?

CJ
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Comments  
Anon,
AnonymousHabitual/ Present event
Where do you work?
Do I go now?
Do -is used as an aux.here (like, will, may, have, shall, and such)
When referring to habitual present, the tense pertains to the main verb, and not the aux.
My mom gets up at 6 am everyday.

She cooks breakfast and packs lunch for everyone before she goes to work.
We usually do groceries on Sundays (note: here, "do" is a verb, and not a aux.)
AnonymousFuture scheduled event
When do we start work?
When does the train leaves?
I don't understand how the questions are future events? They are simple present tense questions.
You can use present tense to describe general statement /inquires and habitual recurrance.
She loves chocolate.

He hates broccolli.
dimsumexpress
AnonymousFuture scheduled event
When do we start work?
When does the train leave?
I don't understand how the questions are future events? They are simple present tense questions.
You can use present tense to describe general statement /inquires and habitual recurrance.
She loves chocolate.
He hates broccolli.
Imagine you are being employed and you ask, "When do I start work?". That's referring to the future.
If you were waiting on board a stationary train for a long time, you'd say "When does this train leave?". Again, it's about the future. Present tense is also used for futurity.

I am busy tomorrow.
Does it begin this evening?
What time do you finish work (today)?
The list goes on...
Anonymous"When does this train leave?"
Anonymous"When do I start work?".
No, this is no reference of future events. If you use "will" instead of "does" and "do ", then yes, it is a question suggesting future time.
Do and does are used for regular habitual statements and questions.

I do my exercise in the morning.
My friends and I practice soccer on Sundays.
AnonymousI am busy tomorrow. - is fine but it's a present statement about tomorow.
Does it begin this evening? Same deal here
What time do you finish work (today)?
The list goes on...


You are in essence forcibly using present verb with future time markers and call it future tense. uh uh!

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dimsumexpress You are in essence forcibly using present verb with future time markers and call it future tense. uh uh!
I am not forcibly using it and no they are not called future tense (please don't add words I didn't say). Such are the usage of present tense for futurity, They are examples on my Cambridge grammar book and taught by ESL teachers in other forums. They do not need future time markers if it's clear in the context that it's referring to the future.
dimsumexpress
Anonymous"When does this train leave?"
Anonymous"When do I start work?".
No, this is no reference of future events. If you use "will" instead of "does" and "do ", then yes, it is a question suggesting future time.

Do and does are used for regular habitual statements and questions.

I do my exercise in the morning.

My friends and I practice soccer on Sundays.

Are you saying "When do I start work?" is a habitually action? I don't think so. None of the ESL teachers pointed that out as incorrect.

"When do I start work?" "I start work tomorrow"
aux. "do" is added to the question form to be grammatically correct. "Start" refers to future. A example of present tense to refer to the future.

dimsumexpress
AnonymousI am busy tomorrow. - is fine but it's a present statement about tomorow.
Does it begin this evening? Same deal here
What time do you finish work (today)?
The list goes on...


Thanks for concurring with me.
 Optilang's reply was promoted to an answer.
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To answer the original question, you could say "Where should I collect it?" or "Oh, where should I have gone?" but what you have is natural enough to my ears.
Thanks! Emotion: smile
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