What is the present tense of beat huh??\
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Today I beat the drum.

Yesterday I beat the drum.

I have beat the drum every day.

The dictionary should show present, past, and past participle as identical.
Really? I would have said it's beat (present), beat (past), and beaten (past participle). "I have beat" sounds really wrong to my ear.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/beat shows both "beaten" and "beat" for the past participle.
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Thanks for the correction, khoff. I should have included that option. Emotion: embarrassed

My present tense example was not the best either!

"I beat the drum today/this morning" could be taken as past tense, i.e., "earlier today."
AnonymousWhat is the present tense of beat huh??
Perhaps present tense as habitual behavior: "I [do] beat the drum every morning."

(Well, if you use the "do" option, "beat" becomes the base form, rather than the present tense.) Emotion: rofl

How about an imperative sentence?

Beat the drum louder!

That's clearly present tense.
AvangiHow about an imperative sentence?
Beat the drum louder!
That's clearly present tense.
Oops! It's clearly present time, but not present tense! Imperatives have no tense. They are a mood. The difference is clear for the verb be.

Present tense: am, is, are He is ready. They are ready.

Imperative: be Be ready!

Emotion: geeked

CJ
Holy Mackerel!

Thanks, Jim!

I never thought about it before, but you're obviously right on!Emotion: nodding

Hmmm, but you wouldn't say that the verb in an imperative sentence is a mood, would you?

I'm searching for a comfortable way to express this.

I guess the best you can do is to express it as a rule:

Imperative sentences use the base form of the verb / bare infinitive.

How about, Jesus said, "Do unto others etc."

Is this past time?

Edit. Sorry. Stupid question.
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Hi CJ,

"Imperatives have no tense. They are a mood."

Does a mood exclude a grammatical tense? Or, is this particular mood, the imperative, tenseless?
Avangiyou wouldn't say that the verb in an imperative sentence is a mood, would you?
No. The verb isn't a mood. The verb is ina mood - hopefully in a good mood. Emotion: rofl

AvangiImperative sentences use the base form of the verb / bare infinitive.
It works for me.

AvangiHow about, Jesus said, "Do unto others etc." Is this past time?
Jesus lived a long time ago, so it must be past, right? Emotion: smile

CJ
Anonymous"Imperatives have no tense. They are a mood."

Does a mood exclude a grammatical tense? Or, is this particular mood, the imperative, tenseless?
As was already noted above, this was clumsily worded. It's not a matter of imperatives being a mood. It's that any verb may be presented in imperative mood, i.e., in its "command form". This form is identical to the base form (also called the bare infinitive).

Mood does not exclude grammatical tense in the general case. The subjunctive mood is represented by more than one tense, for example. But there is only one imperative form, so there is no advantage to saying that that form has a tense. You may say that it is in the present tense if you wish, but it's redundant to do so once you have specified that it's an imperative.

CJ
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