+0
You have promised many solutions to our economic problems, social issues, etc. My question is, what will you implement if you are elected president in the first 100 days in office, judging by the speech things are done in Washington?

Is the above correct?
Thanks.
Comments  
Hi,
You have promised many solutions to our economic problems, social issues, etc. My question is, what will you implement if you are elected president in the first 100 days in office, judging by the speed things are done in Washington?

I'd prefer to rearrange the second sentence a bit, ie
My question is, if you are elected president, and judging by the speed things are done in Washington, what will you implement in your first 100 days in office?

Clive
Thanks, Clive. It sounds much better after the rearrangement.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I prefer "what will you do" or "what programs will you implement".
That usage of implementbothers me. Emotion: smile
CJ
CalifJimI understand I'm eating but not I'm implementing!
I think I see your point. It's not intransitive.
How about the following?

CJ, Do you understand "I'm doing"?
I was afraid this might happen. You answered before I had a chance to edit my response.
This was, in fact, not an "absolute" use of implement. You caught the mistake with your example I'm doing. Emotion: smile
CJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
CalifJim not an "absolute" use of implement. You caught the mistake with your example I'm doing
Sorry, I don't quite get it, CJ. Are you saying "I'm doing" is not a right usage just like "I'm implementing"? I guess I don't quite understand the meaning of 'absolute' use.
"Absolute" use means omitting a direct object after a verb that is normally transitive, the object being easily inferred from the context. For example, eat is transitive. When you say "I'm eating" it means you are eating food, of course. food is the inferred object. While some analysts see this as an intransitive use of eat, it is not intransitive in the same sense as other verbs like sleep are intransitive.
What will you implement? does not illustrate an 'absolute' use. (That's why I edited the post in which I claimed it did.) The direct object is "what".
So my objection to What will you implement? cannot be that it is an 'absolute' use.
My objection must be related to something different. And yet I can't quite explain what that something is. Maybe some verbs (like implement) have the property that a fairly specific kind of object must occur in the sentence. In this case, to my ear, the use of What program(s) removes the objection.
Perhaps enjoy is another such verb:
What will you enjoy on your trip? seems wrong -- missing something. Yet What activities will you enjoy on your trip? seems all right.

It's not obvious to me that there is any grammatical theory that explains this phenomenon that interrogative object What? is sometimes too little to provide a credible object for a particular verb. At least I've never run into a discussion of it before.
I'm sure there are other verbs with the same property. It might be instructive (some day) to find other examples.
CJ