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Hi,

I have a doubt whether it should "in" or "for" in the following sentence (before preventing):

Hand hygiene cannot be replaced but much more can

be done (in/for?) preventing the spread of harmful bacteria on

touch surfaces.

AM
Comments  
Hi Calive

The whole sentence is oddly written. Without addressing the wording in the rest of the sentence, I would suggest this wording in the part you highlighted:
"... be done in order to prevent the ..."
I would say in preventing, but I am not a native speaker.
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Hand hygiene cannot be replaced but much more can

be done (in/for?) preventing the spread of harmful bacteria on

touch surfaces.

Or

.... more can be done to prevent the spread ......
wholegrainI would say in preventing
That an error.

Yankee is right about the peculiar wording. I'm not familiar with the expression "hand hygiene" but it's obvious it means "to was ones hands". Anyway something like the following is a lot easier to read, (for me at least): Nothing will replace the benefits of hand hygiene, but regarding work surfaces much more can be done to prevent the transmission of harmful bacteria.
Hi Yankee,

Yes, I agree with your observation about the sentence
and also your suggestion.

Thanks!

Calive
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As stated above by others, in this particular sentence you need "more can be done to prevent the spread ...".
This sentence aside, you can use either "for" or "in" before "preventing".
"for (preventing)" connotes "for the purpose of (preventing)".
"in (preventing)" connotes "while in the process of (preventing)"
CJ
CJ,

Thanks for making the difference between "in" and "for" clear.

Calive