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1. Does "the label" in the provided context mean "Capitalist Realism"?


2. Does "the problematic relationship with consumer culture experienced by artists such as Richter and Polke" mean "the challenging (difficult and bad) relationship that artists such as Richter and Polke had with consumer culture"?


Context:

When coined in relation to Pop Art in Germany, Capitalist Realism was used to define a key moment of change in West German contemporary art when Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke, Konrad Lueg and their peer group in Düsseldorf began to engage with popular culture. Although it had formed part of the title of the exhibition he had organised with Konrad Lueg, Living with Pop: Demonstration for Capitalist Realism in 1963, Richter has always
downplayed the significance of the term that was to refer to a short-lived moment in his career as a whole. To be fair, the exhibition was actually an installation/event in the Berges Furniture Store that lasted one night only and is not really indicative of the complex and mixed trajectories that Richter’s career was to follow. However, the label has proved resonant among historians and critics, seemingly because it helps in the mapping out of the context in which German Pop Art developed and underscores the problematic relationship with consumer culture experienced by artists such as Richter and Polke, who had originated from and trained in East Germany.

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1) Yes

2) Yes