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You are going to read an article about student-teacher relations on the Internet. After that you
are to complete statements 1-5 by choosing the best answer (a, b or c) according to the text. Please, help me! Check my answers!!


Should You Be Facebook Friends With Your Teachers?

The impact of the Facebook craze has swept across the high school population. But now, the
growing popularity of this social networking site has spread beyond the student level: teachers
are now becoming “friends” with students on Facebook. This method of communication can be
useful in many ways. Teachers can now post class notes onto the site, allowing students who
have missed classes to easily catch up on course material. As well, shy students no longer have
to raise trembling hands and stammer out questions in front of the whole class to receive help.
Besides providing academic support, the social networking site also allows teachers to notify
students of meetings and practices for clubs and sports teams.
However, behind this convenience hides a somewhat sticky issue. Since users can view photos
and other personal content related to their “friends,” it is now possible for students to poke their
nose into the private lives of their teachers and vice versa. This of course, raises the question:
“When does this access to information become inappropriate?”
Many teachers prefer to stay away from this ticking moral time bomb. They claim that Facebook
does expose both teachers and students to fairly significant risk when it comes to respecting the
boundaries between educator and student. Teachers that would never take a child to lunch or
offer to drive a student home may not hesitate to add a student as a “friend” on Facebook,
exposing the student to personal information never shared in a classroom setting.
Teachers are not the only ones who are having second thoughts on the issue. Students are equally
nervous about teachers having access to their Facebook walls. After all, it may not be a good
idea to allow your math teacher to read your rants about the uselessness of trigonometry! Most
students agree that after graduation, these “online friendships” are no longer a sensitive issue.
In the end, the choice of whether or not to offer or accept a friend request is to be made by each
student and teacher. However, just to be safe, it is probably best to save those friend requests for
your favourite teachers until after graduation.

1. Teachers nowadays are often using social networks because
a) it’s easy to teach their subjects with the help of such networks.
b) social networks have become very popular with teachers as well.
c) they want to help their shy students.

2. The author of the text implies that
a) teachers see a clear difference between the real life and the Internet.
b) teachers compare the Internet to a ‘ticking moral time bomb’.
c) every teacher would prefer to take a student to lunch rather than to add a student as a “friend”
on the Facebook.

3. The author of the article believes that
a) some teachers worry about the inappropriate access to information in the social networks.
b) both teachers and students worry about the inappropriate access of information in the social
networks.
c) math teachers worry about the attitude to their subject.

4. Many students think that
a) all their notes in the social networks may seem offensive to their teachers.
b) “online friendships” with teachers are inappropriate.
c) it’s much better to make ‘friends’ with your teacher when you become a graduate.

5. The author of the story is sure that
a) Facebook is universally thought to be ‘a ticking moral time bomb’.
b) Facebook is a good educational resource
c) students should probably wait until graduation with sending friend requests to their favourite
teachers.

You are going to read an article about some issues of students’ integrity. After that you are to
complete statements 6-10 by choosing the best answer (a, b or c) according to the text.

School Cheats Find The Web's The Way

Students are not only getting music from the Internet – they're downloading good grades. An
ENQUIRER investigation discovered an explosion in cheating and plagiarism made possible by
web sites with such brazen names as Schoolsucks.com and CheatHouse.com. It's as easy as
punching a couple of keyboard buttons to summon up ready-made term papers, research projects
and other information from the Internet. And if you don't find the paper you want in their huge
collections, you can pay skilful scholars-for-hire to write one for you.
Cheating is so rampant, say experts, that the "three Rs" are becoming Reading, 'Ritin' and Ripoff.
The research carried out by the nonprofit Center for Academic Integrity shows that Internet
plagiarism is a growing national concern. Over 75 percent of all students admit to cheating on
some level. Students who are caught often say their lives are so busy with extracurricular
activities that they plagiarize to save time.
Demand determines supply. CheatHouse.com, for example, boasts more than 10,000 essays for
sale. Its creator Jens Schriver distances himself from matters of integrity. "I provide a service not
too different from that of a library," he rationalizes, "it can be used legitimately, to do research
and get inspired."
On the other hand, the faculty are often reluctant to pursue suspicions of plagiarism. This can be
explained by various reasons – from not wanting to spend the time and effort to not feeling
supported by the academic system. Professors are even sometimes fearful that it could badly
affect their relations with the audience.
The need for a deterrent to student cheating became so pressing that a special web site was
created, called www.turnitin.com, which uses web-crawling robots to search the Internet for
proof of plagiarism. This site can be accessed by educators who want to check on a suspicious
term paper. If students know that their term papers will be compared to over two billion pages
from the Internet by a room full of computers, then they will probably be motivated to write their
own!

6. According to the article, some students are so much attached to the Internet because
a) they use it as an aid in their research projects.
b) they want to get the best results without making much effort.
c) they want to address skilful scholars to get some help.

7. According to the second paragraph of the article,
a) more than half of all students download some materials from the Internet.
b) officials worry about the growing rate of the Internet plagiarism.
c) over 75 percent of all students admit to downloading their term papers and research
projects from the Internet.

8. The words of Jens Schriver, the creator of CheatHouse.com imply that
a) students use his site as a library.
b) the Internet sites of this kind are not necessarily used for cheating.
c) it’s not he who is responsible for the legitimacy of the students’ activities.

9. The author implies that
a) professors often turn a blind eye to cheating.
b) pay too much attention to their relations with the audience.
c) do not have spare time to pursue suspicions of plagiarism.

10. The web site called www.turnitin.com was created
a) to motivate students to work on their own.
b) to check if all students’ works are downloaded from the Internet.
c) to make sure that students’ works do not contain plagiarized fragments.
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1, 2, 7, 8, 9 are wrong.
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1. Teachers nowadays are often using social networks because

a) it’s easy to teach their subjects with the help of such networks.

b) social networks have become very popular with teachers as well.

c) they want to help their shy students.

2. The author of the text implies that

a) teachers see a clear difference between the real life and the Internet.

b) teachers compare the Internet to a ‘ticking moral time bomb’.

c) every teacher would prefer to take a student to lunch rather than to add a student as a “friend”

on the Facebook.

7. According to the second paragraph of the article,

a) more than half of all students download some materials from the Internet.

b) officials worry about the growing rate of the Internet plagiarism.

c) over 75 percent of all students admit to downloading their term papers and research

projects from the Internet.

8. The words of Jens Schriver, the creator of CheatHouse.com imply that

a) students use his site as a library.

b) the Internet sites of this kind are not necessarily used for cheating.

c) it’s not he who is responsible for the legitimacy of the students’ activities.

9. The author implies that

a) professors often turn a blind eye to cheating.

b) pay too much attention to their relations with the audience.

c) do not have spare time to pursue suspicions of plagiarism.

Are they right now?
7, 8, 9 are still wrong.
7. According to the second paragraph of the article,
a) more than half of all students download some materials from the Internet.
b) officials worry about the growing rate of the Internet plagiarism.
c) over 75 percent of all students admit to downloading their term papers and research
projects from the Internet.

8. The words of Jens Schriver, the creator of CheatHouse.com imply that
a) students use his site as a library.
b) the Internet sites of this kind are not necessarily used for cheating.
c) it’s not he who is responsible for the legitimacy of the students’ activities.

9. The author implies that
a) professors often turn a blind eye to cheating.
b) pay too much attention to their relations with the audience.
c) do not have spare time to pursue suspicions of plagiarism.
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