Anyone got any idea how long that irritating mispronunciation of the plural of "process" has been around? For the last 5 years I've been hearing some folks pronounce it as if were spelled "processeez" (accent on the last syllable), misguidedly and hypercorrectively modeling it on some our Greek-based words such as "thesis, theses" or "basis, bases". A friend of mine insists that he's been hearing it for at least 10 years. Also, how long do you suppose it will take for the infection to spread? Will we soon be hearing of mattresseez and actresseez?
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Anyone got any idea how long that irritating mispronunciation of the plural of "process" has been around? For the last ... do you suppose it will take for the infection to spread? Will we soon be hearing of mattresseez and actresseez?

Don't you know that all the actresseez are actors now?
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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Anyone got any idea how long that irritating mispronunciation of ... spread? Will we soon be hearing of mattresseez and actresseez?

Don't you know that all the actresseez are actors now?

Why not 'actrons'?

J.
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Anyone got any idea how long that irritating mispronunciation of the plural of "process" has been around? For the last ... if were spelled "processeez" ... A friend of mine insists that he's been hearing it for at least 10 years.

I've only ever heard it in computer contexts. Some of my co-workers in the 1980s used to say it, I think, but, thankfully, none at the companies where I've worked since then.

Mark Brader "Although I have not seen any mention of SoftQuad Toronto or HoTMetaL in the magazine, it is certainly (Email Removed) worth while reading." Selwyn Wener
Anyone got any idea how long that irritating mispronunciation of the plural of "process" has been around? For the last ... soon be hearing of mattresseez and actresseez?Well, you certainly will not be hearing "actressez". That is a gender-specific non-PC term.

Izzy
Anyone got any idea how long that irritating mispronunciation of ... that he's been hearing it for at least 10 years.

I've only ever heard it in computer contexts. Some of my co-workers in the 1980s used to say it, I think, but, thankfully, none at the companies where I've worked since then.

I've heard it iin non-computer contexts, but I don't think I've heard it much since the 1980s. Hmm...
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"Alan":

Mark Brader:
I've only ever heard it in computer contexts. Some of my co-workers in the 1980s used to say it...

Richard Fontana:
I've heard it iin non-computer contexts, but I don't think I've heard it much since the 1980s. Hmm...

Well, since writing the above, I have heard it in a non-computer context, since the 1980s. This was an American doctor, talking about biological processes, on yesterday's "Today" show. Just goes to show ya, don't it?

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Anyone got any idea how long that irritating mispronunciation of ... spread? Will we soon be hearing of mattresseez and actresseez?

Don't you know that all the actresseez are actors now?

Only to those who'd like to deny the differences between women and men, between girls and boys. Or what is it? Why the PC crap of today? I hope it is a passing fancy.

Charles Riggs
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"Alan": Mark Brader: Richard Fontana:

I've heard it iin non-computer contexts, but I don't think I've heard it much since the 1980s. Hmm...

Well, since writing the above, I have heard it in a non-computer context, since the 1980s. This was an American doctor, talking about biological processes, on yesterday's "Today" show. Just goes to show ya, don't it?

FWIW many Brits do the opposite with "series", with "is" instead of "ease" /'si@rIz/ i.e. treating it as if it were an ordinary "-ies" plural (e..g "hobbies"). For some reason the very similar word "species" doesn't usually get the same treatment; it's usually "speesh-ease" /'spi:Si:z/.

Ross Howard
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