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I'm sometimes surprised, and somewhat puzzled, when I read linguistics papers written by nonnative speakers. The use of language in such articles can often range for highly proficient to quite poor. The linked text below is an example of such puzzlement. In that paper simple errors appear alongside proficient use of the langauge. I wonder how such a thing can occur. I wonder how a nonnative can have such skilled use of one part of the language and still make basic errors. I also wonder how such errors passed the scrutiny of the editors.

EG

"Nattinger (in Carter and McCarthy, 1998:76) suggests that language is basically a "compositional" process in which many of its words co-occur together forming single units of meaning. He call these as lexical phrases or word combinations;"

Another:

Grammatical collocations consist of a noun, or an adjective or a verb... . The followings are examples: at night, extend to"

http://jurnal-humaniora.ugm.ac.id/do...rio%20rini.pdf
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Comments  
I suppose though we don't always know how much help the writer had, in preparing the article (hence perhaps the more "proficient" parts); or how much work the editors had to do (it's easy to miss one error among many, esp. in on-screen editing).

MrP
I think that co-occur together is something that a native speaker (though hopefully not a linguist) might write.

A Norwegian I knew who spoke almost perfect English sometimes made mistakes with prepositions. She said to me "the most difficult words are the small ones."
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
<I think that co-occur together is something that a native speaker (though hopefully not a linguist) might write.>

Yes, indeed. I guess we can forgive that one.

<She said to me "the most difficult words are the small ones.">

Did she ever come across: Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch?
Hi,

I think this is mostly because the academicians who write these do not have enough time to improve their English.Emotion: thinking They are just too busy or just don't think they need to brush up on their English. They are all the time busy lecturing and reading books about their field. It is not easy to see them speaking in English when they need to say something irrelevant to the subject they taught. Many of them immediately switch to their mother tongue. While studying at the English Teacher Training Department at university in Turkey, I was astounded by the simple mistakes the academicians made during their lecture, but luckily some of them were better than the others.
<I was astounded by the simple mistakes the academicians made during their lecture>

Yes, I find that it's always hundreds of times easier to recognize errors when someone else makes them than to keep myself from making them. Emotion: smile

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
CalifJim<I was astounded by the simple mistakes the academicians made during their lecture>

Yes, I find that it's always hundreds of times easier to recognize errors when someone else makes them than to keep myself from making them. Emotion: smile

CJ
Right. I used "taught" in my post above where I should have written "teach". Emotion: smile
Milky

I'm sometimes surprised, and somewhat puzzled, when I read linguistics papers written by nonnative speakers. The use of language in such articles can often range for highly proficient to quite poor.

He call these as lexical phrases or word combinations;"

Yes, indeed.

CB
CalifJim<I was astounded by the simple mistakes the academicians made during their lecture>

Yes, I find that it's always hundreds of times easier to recognize errors when someone else makes them than to keep myself from making them. Emotion: smile

CJ
Hopefully, if you wrote an academic paper, there would be someone responsible who would check your errors.
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