Greetings.
Does the Jewish practice of writing "G-d" instead of "God" extend to the names of people who happen to share God's name? For example, say there is some foreign language where "God" is a common first or last name. Would an English-speaking Jew who observes the prohibition on writing the name of God in full thus refrain from addressing in writing a person so named? Would such a person receive letters addressed to "Mr. G-d"?

Also, does the prohibition apply to common words which incorporate the name of God (and refer to God himself)? For example, would an observant Jew write "g-dspeed" instead of "godspeed"? Are there any who would refrain from writing the word "goodbye", since it is historically a contraction of "God be with ye"?
Finally, what about the use of the uncapitalized word "god" to refer to a deity in a generic sense? For Jews, were Zeus and Apollo "Greek g-ds" or "Greek gods" or something else entirely?
References to online rabbinical opinions on the matter would be welcome.

Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
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Finally, what about the use of the uncapitalized word "god" to refer to a deity in a generic sense? For Jews, were Zeus and Apollo "Greek g-ds" or "Greek gods" or something else entirely?

Zeus and Apollo were entirely nothing, else or otherwise.
See the FAQ. http://www.pacificnet.net/~faigin/SCJ/faq/index.html
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Martin Ambuhl typed thus:
Finally, what about the use of the uncapitalized word "god" ... Apollo "Greek g-ds" or "Greek gods" or something else entirely?

Zeus and Apollo were entirely nothing, else or otherwise.

If we're going down that track, no more is any "god".

David
==
Does the Jewish practice of writing "G-d" instead of "God" extend to the >names of people who happen to share God's name?

No.
In fact there is no problem when writing it in a profane form, such as the lesser reformed god of "Tilly" who did not think ahead to changes such as democracy.

Binyamin Dissen (Email Removed)
http://www.dissensoftware.com
Greetings.
See the FAQ. http://www.pacificnet.net/~faigin/SCJ/faq/index.html

The FAQ wasn't very helpful:
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You don't have permission to access /~faigin/SCJ/faq/intro.html on this server.
BTW, please don't top-post.
Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
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Greetings.
:>Does the Jewish practice of writing "G-d" instead of "God" extend to :>the names of people who happen to share ... profane form, such as the lesser reformed god of "Tilly" who did not think ahead to changes such as democracy.

Ah, so what about my other question with respect to expressions such as "godspeed"? Since the "god" in "godspeed" presumably refers to the one and only Judeo-Christian God (at least when used by a Jew or Christian), is it considered a sacred form or a profane form?
Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
:>Does the Jewish practice of writing "G-d" instead of "God" ... did not think ahead to changes >> such as democracy.

Ah, so what about my other question with respect to expressions such as >"godspeed"? Since the "god" in "godspeed" presumably ... God (at least when used by a Jew or Christian), >is it considered a sacred form or a profane form?

It isn't G-ds name.
It is merely a word which includes the letters in sequence.

Binyamin Dissen (Email Removed)
http://www.dissensoftware.com
Greetings.
:>Ah, so what about my other question with respect to expressions such as :>"godspeed"? Since the "god" in "godspeed" presumably ... form or a profane form? It isn't G-ds name. It is merely a word which includes the letters in sequence.

Forgive me, but I don't understand the distinction. "God's" is also not God's name, yet you left out the "o" when you spelled it, presumably because it refers to God. By the same token, I presume you would also leave the "o" out of other inflected forms and compounds such as "God-fearing", "Godly", and "anti-God", at least when they refer specifically to the Jewish god. So why is "godspeed" any different, when it's simply a contracted form of "May God speed you on your journey"? Certainly this case is distinct from a word like "ergodic", which "merely includes" the letters in sequence and has nothing to do with a supreme being. Similarly, "goodbye" also names God, albeit with an altered spelling.
Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
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