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Hi,
He promised to fix the TV.
Can I use 'pledged' instead of 'promised'? What is their difference in meaning here?

Thanks.
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Comments  
Hi,
The major difference is that 'promised' is what is said 99% of the time.

Clive
Hi Clive,

Thank you very much for your reply. But I don't know what you mean by 'what is said 99% of the time.' Could you explain about it? Do you mean 'pledge' is fine here?

Thanks.
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Hi,
Let me try to put it more simply. Nobody would use the word 'pledge' in a sentence like this.

It's a much more formal word, that is used much less often. It's a word that is used on much more formal occasions when speaking about much more important matters.

Clive
Hi Clive,

Thank you very much for your explanation! I know what you mean by that. I got the following example from online dictionary, can I use 'committed' instead of 'pledged' here? What is the subtle difference in meaning between 'pledge' and 'commit' here? Is commit' only used in formal cases?

"Trade unions pledged themselves to resist the government plans."

"Trade unions committed themselves to resisting the government plans."

Is 'promise' suitable to use in a sentence like this?

Thanks.
A pledge is a promise to pay something.  
Examples:

I pledged $100 to the charity this year.
I pledge allegiance to the flag (I promise to pay respect and give of my time and service.)

Promise means that I commit do something, not necessarily any payment.

Examples:

I promise to write you once a week.
He promised that the TV would be ready by next Tuesday.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
1) "Pledge themselves" means that they promise to spend a lot of time, effort and energy on resisting the government plans. It is the strongest statement. "Pledge" implies a specific criteria of amount of effort or payment. So If someone says "I pledge ...", I can ask "What is your pledge?" or "How much do you pledge?"
2) "Committed themselves" is not quite as strong. It means that the cause is very important to them, but does not have the same sense of a specific amount of effort or payment. 
3) "Promised to resist government plans" is the most vague (weakest) statement. It has no connotation of priority or amount of effort. 
Hi AlpheccaStars,

Thank you very much for your clear explanations about them. Do you mean we can use 'promise' in formal situations? Is 'commit' only used in formal cases when meaning 'promise'?

Do 'pledge' and 'commit' imply they will definitely do what they have promised and 'promise' implies that they might or might not do what they have promised?

Thanks.
Hi,

Can I omit 'themselves' in ' They committed themselves to...'?

Is there any difference in meaning between 'I pledged myself to...' and 'I pledged to...'?

Thanks.
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