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Do you touch your upper jaw every time when you pronounce "l" in a word?

I know it is correct to do so, if "l" is at the beginning of a word, such as "less", "laugh" etc.

But what about words like "trial", do you touch your upper jaw(the meat) when you pronounce the "l" at the end?

what about words with "l" in the middle, such as "hale", "rules", do you ignore them, or you actually touch the upper jaw too? Thank you very much.
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Please help me with it, it is just a simple question for you native speaker. However, it confused me for some time now, I really would like the problem to be solved earlier. Thank you for whoever that help.
Hi CoolBun,
apart from the "General Grammar Help" section of the forum, the other sections are checked less often, so, for example, after posting a question here, the poster might even have to wait a couple of days before getting a good answer.

Your question is exactly the same as one I asked some time ago. It is a good question, but it is difficult to answer, I believe.

Anyway, let's try to discuss this matter.
In initial position (ex: less, langauge, lick, loop) the tip of my tongue touches the roof of my mouth (what you call "upper jaw").
In final position (ex: cool, trial, feel) I don't really know what the tip of my tongue does. I think it touches the roof, but probably it often touches the roof in a more slight way than it does in initial position. If those words are in the middle of a sentence and I try to speak fast, I think in some cases the tip don't touch the roof. But it depends on what word follows...
In middle position (ex: California, ruling) the tongue usually touches the roof of the mouth.

In the end, I think much depends on people's accents, tone of voice, etc. I once asked "Do your tongue touch the roof of your mouth when you say cool?" - A native speaker said "Yes, you can't do a L without touching the roof", another said "No", another said "It depends how lazy I am".

Emotion: smile
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>> I once asked "Do your tongue touch the roof of your mouth when you say cool?" - A native speaker said "Yes, you can't do a L without touching the roof", another said "No", another said "It depends how lazy I am". <<

Well, l-vocalization is a common feature in several dialects. /l/ at the end of a word or before a consonant is replaced by /o/ /u/ or /w/. This exists in Cockney, Estuary English, African-American vernacular English, and some dialects in the Upper Midwest, especially in Wisconsin and Michigan.
I'm originally from Michigan, near Wisconsin, and I've never noticed that phenomenon in that area.

CJ
Do you touch your upper jaw every time when you pronounce "l" in a word?
With my fingers? No! Emotion: smile
But seriously, my tongue touches an area just above my teeth for most initial L's; it touches my teeth for other L's, sometimes quite close to the edge of the teeth. Just as important, there is a tightening in the back of my throat for final L's (velarization), whereas there is not for the other L's.

CJ
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>>
I'm originally from Michigan, near Wisconsin, and I've never noticed that phenomenon in that area. <<

Only some people have it in certain areas. It's far from being universal.