Hi All,
How does one pronounce capillary - I pronounce it with stress on ca and letting larry rhyme on Harry.
Now it seems I am a laugh amongst my colleagues who all claim it is pronounced with stress on pill, and letting pillary rhyme on Hillary - so...I think it's about time to have English native speakers comment on this...
(I have a feeling we are talking differences between American or British English (?) since I have been taught mostly by americans.) Leo
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Hi All, How does one pronounce capillary - I pronounce it with stress on ca and letting larry rhyme on Harry.

That's only correct in non-MINMINM. See below.
Now it seems I am a laugh amongst my colleagues who all claim it is pronounced with stress on pill, and letting pillary rhyme on Hillary -

Not correct, at least in American English.
so...I think it's about time to have English native speakers comment on this...

In American English it's /'[email protected],lEri/. "KAP-a-lerry". That applies to MINMINM as well as non-MINMINM AmE (use the "merry" vowel). If you pronounce "marry" and "merry" the same (nothing wrong with that - Sparky Cunningham, le Grand Robert of AUE and Doyen of English Usage, does so).
Actually, some MINMINMs might not use the "merry" vowel there. Google for a discussion between me and Aaron Dinkin about this. Are you MINMINM? "Larry" rhymes with "marry", yo.

Steny '08!
Guess it's a pondian thing. Collins gives only the second-syllable stressed version (which is the only one I've heard).

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
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Thanks a lot for your answer...
I tried googling for minminm - and even though I did find some use of minminm I found no definitions - so, what is minminm and the variants?
Hi All, How does one pronounce capillary - I pronounce it with stress on ca and letting larry rhyme on ... a feeling we are talking differences between American or British English (?) since I have been taught mostly by americans.)

It's the Hillary version in British English, stress on "pill".

Alan Jones
Thanks a lot for your answer... I tried googling for minminm - and even though I did find some use of minminm I found no definitions - so, what is minminm and the variants?

(ObSparky)
MINMINM = "Mary is not marry is not merry" (i.e., each of Mary, marry, and merry has a distinct vowel). Characteristic of most BrE accents and the accents of some highly-populous cities of the East Coast of the U.S. Representative accents: StAlbE, DinkE, PNYPS, YngJoE.

MIMIM = "Mary is marry is merry" (i.e., Mary, marry, and merry are pronounced alike). Characteristic of the accents of most Western U.S. Speakers (WUSSes) and Midwestern speakers. Representative accents: SparkE, ErkE, TCE, JerrE, RayWisE.
MIMBMID = "Mary is merry, but marry is different". This variety seems to be pretty common in the eastern U.S., but I don't know that much about it. Representative accents: ManfrE? I think my grandmother had this sort of accent too (she was from Boonton, N.J.).

Steny '08!
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Thanks for clearing this - pretty obvious when one knows it actually.

Welle, I don't fit the scheme - I think MIMIM comes closest, but Mary is a bit different - if I say "Merry Mary marry me" it definitely is different. It may be just the length rather than the quality, however, but I have no one near to ask.
Hi All, How does one pronounce capillary - I pronounce it with stress on ca and

It's the Hillary version in British English, stress on "pill".

hmmm... interesting. I come from the North Midlands of the UK and was taught caPILLyary, a very slight 'y' sound after the 'L' - probably something to do with the double-L pronunciation in (for example) the French 'ville'. OTOH this could just be plain 'wrong' anyone else come accross this variation in Br. Eng?
Derek
It's the Hillary version in British English, stress on "pill".

hmmm... interesting. I come from the North Midlands of the UK and was taught caPILLyary, a very slight 'y' sound ... example) the French 'ville'. OTOH this could just be plain 'wrong' anyone else come accross this variation in Br. Eng?

Is it possible that whoever taught you supposed that the spelling was "capilliary"? I used to clean the blackboard after a chemistry colleague who evidently thought that "phosphorous" was the name of an element, and as for one of the geography staff . . . So a degree in a subject doesn't confer the ability to spell all its technical terms.
Alan Jones
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