It seems that quite a few place names in England, if not elsewhere in Britain, have "le" followed by an English words as a component of the name. The only example that comes to mind right now is "Chester-le-Street". How is this pronounced, and how are these "le"'s generally pronounced in such names?
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It seems that quite a few place names in England, if not elsewhere in Britain, have "le" followed by an ... to mind right now is "Chester-le-Street". How is this pronounced, and how are these "le"'s generally pronounced in such names?

It's sometimes pronounced "lee" to rhyme with tree, and sometimes as in the French article. There is a small town north of Warrington called Newton-le-Willows which is Newton Lee Willows, or possibly Newton-ly Willows. I think your example is more usually Chester le Street.

David
I say what it occurs to me to say.
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It seems that quite a few place names in England, if not elsewhere in Britain, have "le" followed by an ... to mind right now is "Chester-le-Street". How is this pronounced, and how are these "le"'s generally pronounced in such names?

And just a few miles away you have Houghton-le-Spring, and next door to it Hetton-le-Hole. In all three cases locals pronounce it "ly" (as in the adverb ending), though people from elsewhere tend to pronounce it in the French way.
Steve Howarth
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It seems that quite a few place names in England, ... and how are these "le"'s generally pronounced in such names?

It's sometimes pronounced "lee" to rhyme with tree, and sometimes as in the French article. There is a small town north of Warrington called Newton-le-Willows which is Newton Lee Willows, or possibly Newton-ly Willows. I think your example is more usually Chester le Street.

But Ashby de la Zouche is [email protected] [email protected], and the family name De La Rue is [email protected]'roo or sometimes '[email protected]
Philip Eden
It seems that quite a few place names in England, if not elsewhere in Britain, have "le" followed by an ... to mind right now is "Chester-le-Street". How is this pronounced, and how are these "le"'s generally pronounced in such names?

I heard it pronounced "Chesterlee Street", and there was also "Hettonlee Hole", and (I think) "Hootonlee Spring". I'm not sure about the last, because there is a suburb (AmE=neighbourhood) in Johannesburg called "Houghton", and it is pronounced "[email protected]". I know an American whose surname is Houghton, and he pronounces it "[email protected]".
Please excuse the eye dialect, it is not intended to be offensive.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
It's sometimes pronounced "lee" to rhyme with tree, and sometimes ... I think your example is more usually Chester le Street.

But Ashby de la Zouche is [email protected] [email protected], and the family name De La Rue is [email protected]'roo or sometimes '[email protected]

How does Chapel en le Frith sound? I have a feeling that the 'en' bit often gets omitted.
Matti
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It seems that quite a few place names in England, ... and how are these "le"'s generally pronounced in such names?

And just a few miles away you have Houghton-le-Spring, and next door to it Hetton-le-Hole. In all three cases locals pronounce it "ly" (as in the adverb ending), though people from elsewhere tend to pronounce it in the French way.

Don't forget Dalton-le-Dale.
Keith
Associate, Society for Editors and Proofreaders
Member, Society of Indexers
It seems that quite a few place names in England, if not elsewhere in Britain, have "le" followed by an ... to mind right now is "Chester-le-Street". How is this pronounced, and how are these "le"'s generally pronounced in such names?

No one's mentioned Marylebone, pronounced "marley-bone." That one's interesting because the "y" vanishes, even though it looks as if the "e" should be what is silent. Origin, from "Mary+le+burna," "Mary of the stream," according to the Times Atlas of London. Not "bon/bonne" meaning "good," which I think many of us would have guessed.

Best Donna Richoux
It seems that quite a few place names in England, ... and how are these "le"'s generally pronounced in such names?

No one's mentioned Marylebone, pronounced "marley-bone." That one's interesting because the "y" vanishes, even though it looks as if the ... according to the Times Atlas of London. Not "bon/bonne" meaning "good," which I think many of us would have guessed.

Brewer's Dic. of Names says the stream that became known as St Mary's was originally Tyburn ('boundary stream'). The change was made because of the association with the gallows at Tyburn. Brewer also says the 'le' was probably inserted by false association with St Mary-le-Bow of Bow Bells fame.

John Dean
Oxford
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