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The French noun meaning the same as the English "Fort" ... form of the adjective "fort" and the t is sounded.

What I find interesting is that the French noun "fort" had exactly the right meaning back in the 1600s, when ... course the feminine form of the adjective "strong," and it's the musical term borrowed from Italian between 1798 and 1832.

Does anyone know how "forte" is pronounced in modern French? I had started posting this question, with my usual rambling associations, but then thought the better of it.
It seems that when a word's etymology becomes sufficiently muddled, the hankering to maintain a particular spelling or pronunciation is wasted effort.
After all, if "fort (strong point)" came from French in the 17th C, did not "fort (reinforced building, wall or abutment)" come from French after 1066 and all that? Or do we suppose the English never had such a word or concept (I mean, was "the island" completely safe and unthreatened to the point that it didn't need coastal defences throught the Tudor era)?
So the English spelling of the noun with an "e" did not come directly from French. It was borrowed as "fort" and changed to "forte". As to how it's been pronounced, that's another discussion.

Well, if the French could borrow and change Italian spelling and pronunciation, then I think we in the modern world can do that, too, to French, without resorting to "my music teacher said" or "for generations our family have said (because we all went on the Grand Tour, didn't we?) such and so".
In French, "forte" is of course the feminine form of the adjective "strong," and it's the musical term borrowed from Italian between 1798 and 1832.

Glossaire des termes musicaux et informatiques
http://www.arpegemusique.com/manuel30/glossaire.htm#F

Forte: Terme italien signifiant fort. Il est placé dans la partition sous la forme d'un F arrondi, pour indiquer qu'il faut jouer fort.

In French, "forte" is the feminine form of the adjective "fort". There is no such word as "strong" in French. Some meanings of fort/forte do correspond with some of the meanings of the English word "strong", sure, but there is not a perfect one-to-one correspondence between the two.
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Well, if the French could borrow and change Italian spelling and pronunciation, then I think we in the modern world ... or "for generations our family have said (because we all went on the Grand Tour, didn't we?) such and so".

But they didn't. Fort/forte were in OF a long time before the 17th century. Forte, the musical term, is considered a terme italien.
Forteresse and citadelle are allied words. The t is silent.

The 't' is silent in one or both? See-ah-dell? Thanks.

Jeff

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The various pronunciations of "forte" have been discussed before in ... (If you have other pronunciations, by all means include them.)

French strong point: /fOrt/ or /'fOrteI/, partly depending on who I'm talking to. Italian adjective, adverb, or noun: /'fOrteI/.

Same here, though I don't think I use the French-derived one enough to be entitled to have an opinion on its pronunciation. The old joke "The piano is not my forte" (where it needs must have two syllables), is probably where I most often hear (or say) it.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

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In French, "forte" is of course the feminine form of the adjective "strong," and it's the musical term borrowed from Italian between 1798 and 1832

So late? That's surprising. The Italian sonata was all the rage in France a hundred years earlier.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

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Does anyone know how "forte" is pronounced in modern French?

The Oxford-Hachette French Dictionary says it's pronounced 'fRte'.
The Pronunciation section defines the symbols as follows:

f as in foire
as in corps
R as in rire
t as in train
e as in dé
Seems like it would be something like "fortay".
Does anyone know how "forte" is pronounced in modern French?

The Oxford-Hachette French Dictionary says it's pronounced 'fRte'. The Pronunciation section defines the symbols as follows: f as ... R as in rire t as in train e as in dé Seems like it would be something like "fortay".

That's for the Italian loan-word meaning "loud" in music, isn't it?

Drop the final /e/ (or, in stage-speech, singing, and some dialects, reduce it to a schwa) for the feminine form of the French adjective "fort".

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
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Does anyone know how "forte" is pronounced in modern French?

The Oxford-Hachette French Dictionary says it's pronounced 'fRte'. The Pronunciation section defines the symbols as follows: f as ... R as in rire t as in train e as in d=E9 Seems like it would be something like "fortay".

Rubbish. "forte" is pronounced to rhyme with "porte", "morte", etc. Like the English word "court" but with a trace of the final 'e',
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