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Rubbish. "forte" is pronounced to rhyme with "porte", "morte", etc. Like the English word "court" but with a trace of the final 'e',

There are two words spelled "forte" in present-day French, but only one of them has its own entry in the dictionary (the other is the feminine form of "fort").

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

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There are two words spelled "forte" in present-day French, but only one of them has its own entry in the dictionary (the other is the feminine form of "fort").

You are absolutely correct.
http://www.cnrtl.fr/lexicographie/forte
FORTE, adv. et subst. masc. inv.
MUSIQUE
I.- Adv. (Placé avant un passage pour en indiquer la nuance; abrév. f ou F) Fort. Chanter, jouer forte. Ces accords de trois et quatre sons ne sont exécutables au violon que forte ou mezzo forte : l'accord doit donner un accent qui sera sec et violent (Busser, E. Guiraud, Instrument., 1933, p. 13).
- Emploi subst. masc. inv. Nuance de son, correspondant à une grande intensité; passage exécuté dans cette nuance. (Il faut) que les « forte » soient terribles, les « piano » tantôt menaçants et tantôt attendris (Berlioz, À travers chants, 1862, p. 172). Certains sons ont, par exemple, des attaques glissées, ou arrachées, ou « s'évasent » (c'est-à- dire passent brusquement du piano au forte) (Schaeffer, Rech. mus. concr., 1952, p. 94).
II.- Subst. masc. inv. Abrév. de forte-piano* (v. ce mot II). On nous a dit que votre chère filleule a un si beau talent sur le forté, que nous serions bien enchantées de l'entendre (Balzac, U. Mirouët, 1841, p. 99).
Prononc. et Orth. : (f??te). Ds Ac. 1835-1932. Au plur. des forte. Le mot n'a été francisé ni dans la prononc. ni dans la graph. pour le plur., ce qui ,,s'explique par le caractère spécial du vocabulaire et par le fait que la forme italienne s'appuie dans ce vocabulaire sur un ensemble d'emprunts à l'italien`` (Dupré 1972, p. 1044). Noter cependant la forme francisée forté ds la docum. (Balzac, loc. cit.). Étymol. et Hist. 1705 (Brossard). Adv. ital. signifiant proprement « fortement » (fort1*). Bbg. Hope 1971, p. 361.
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Rubbish. "forte" is pronounced to rhyme with "porte", "morte", etc. Like the English word "court" but with a trace of the final 'e',

There are two words spelled "forte" in present-day French, but only one of them has its own entry in the dictionary (the other is the feminine form of "fort").

That can be construed to be true, but in fact "fort" and "forte" share an entry, so neither one has its own. What the Oxford Hachette says is
fort, ~e
But yes, there is a separate entry for the adverb "forte".
On 17 Apr 2007 11:35:39 -0700, contrex
Rubbish. "forte" is pronounced to rhyme with "porte", "morte", etc. Like the English word "court" but with a trace of the final 'e',

I suggest you write to the Oxford University Press and tell them they're disseminating rubbish. They should find that interesting to learn.
Rubbish. "forte" is pronounced to rhyme with "porte", "morte", etc. Like the English word "court" but with a trace of the final 'e',

I suggest you write to the Oxford University Press and tell them they're disseminating rubbish. They should find that interesting to learn.

Well, it really must be a misprint, Bob. That terminal "e" without a diacritic varies from imperceptible to a French sort of schwa. Unmarked "e" would have the sound in the table you give if it appeared before certain consonants in final position.

Mike.

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@newssvr21.news.prodigy.net:

Well, if the French could borrow and change Italian spelling ... went on the Grand Tour, didn't we?) such and so".

But they didn't. Fort/forte were in OF a long time before the 17th century. Forte, the musical term, is considered a terme italien.

Thanks for your answers.
But if the French borrowed the term "forte" from the Italian, then how did they pronounce the Italian word?
As for the meaning of the words, strong and loud are not terribly unrelated. A strong voice may be and often is a loud voice, at least in English. Of course, the whole argument gets confused, because we in the US (and probably the entire English-speaking world) also have adopted the Italian terminology in music.
Do the French pronounce "pianoforte" a la (alla?) italiana? Does it have at least 4 syllables (or even 5)? Or do the French not pronounce the final "e" a la francaise? ('scuse my lack of the proper diacritics.)
I suggest you write to the Oxford University Press and tell them they're disseminating rubbish. They should find that interesting to learn.

Well, it really must be a misprint, Bob. That terminal "e" without a diacritic varies from imperceptible to a French sort of schwa. Unmarked "e" would have the sound in the table you give if it appeared before certain consonants in final position.

The two words the rubbish man referred to, "porte" and "morte", are shown pronounced with the "e" silent: For example, "mort ~e" has /mOR, mORt/.
Is it possible "forte" is pronounced different ways in different French speech communities?
The various pronunciations of "forte" have been discussed before in these newsgroups, of course, but I'd like to ask a ... each term, using the following pronunciations spellings (based upon the entries in the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary). "fort" "FOR-tay" "for-TAY" "FOR-tee"

I think I'm "FOR-tay" for both.

Rob Bannister

31 years southern England with Midland and Northern influences
34 years Western Australia
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Note that the "strong point" "forte" is from French "fort", while the musical term is from Italian "forte".

The funny part is that if we were acknowledging the French origin, we would surely say "for".

Rob Bannister
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