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Do any of you distinguish by pronunciation between the Italian-derived adverb "forte" and the French-derived noun "forte"?

For the Italian adjective, I say "FOR-teh". I don't quite trill the "r", but I flap it a little.
For the French noun, I say "strong point". I can't quite bring myself to say "FOR-tay" when it should be said "fort", but I do want to be clear, and most people would misunderstand the correct pronunciation.

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Note that the "strong point" "forte" is from French "fort", while the musical term is from Italian "forte".

The funny part is that if we were acknowledging the French origin, we would surely say "for".

When did the French stop pronouncing that final "t"? I see that the word entered English as far ago as 1648, and French pronunciation has changed a fair bit since then.
While looking that up, I discovered that it was originally imported with the French spelling "fort", and then:

final -e- added 18c. in imitation of It. forte "strong."
If the final "e" is from Italian, then perhaps we're justified in pronouncing it the Italian way.

Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org

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Is it possible "forte" is pronounced different ways in different French speech communities?

There are two separate words in this discussion. The "forte" that is the feminine form of "fort" (strong) is pronounced with a silent "e". In some, mostly southern, dialects, and sometimes also in singing or careful oration, the final "e" is a mild schwa.
The musical "forte" is different. In French, as in English, it is pronounced with the final vowel as in Italian.

Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org

Please note the changed e-mail and web addresses. The domain eepjm.newcastle.edu.au no longer exists, and I can no longer receive mail at my newcastle.edu.au addresses. The optusnet address could disappear at any time.
After all, if "fort (strong point)" came from French in the 17th C, did not "fort (reinforced building, wall or ... was "the island" completely safe and unthreatened to the point that it didn't need coastal defences throught the Tudor era)?

Burg, caer, caster, castle, dun, fastness, (strong)hold, keep, peel, wall, ward, ...

Odysseus
Well, it really must be a misprint, Bob. That terminal ... give if it appeared before certain consonants in final position.

And NB in Italian loan words which is (I believe) what that entry concerns, and what that pronunciation is for.
The native French "forte" would be in the dico under its masculine form, "fort".
The two words the rubbish man referred to, "porte" and "morte", are shown pronounced with the "e" silent: For example, "mort ~e" has /mOR, mORt/. Is it possible "forte" is pronounced different ways in different French speech communities?

Yup. (Some modern dialects pronounce final "mute" e's, as all dialects once did. But it's a schwa, not an /e/, i.e. /fORt/. The pronunciation /fORte/ or possibly /fORte:/ (?) belongs the Italian loan word, the opposite of "piano", not to the native French "forte".)
And in different registers, too. As I pointed out elsewhere in this thread, the mute e is pronounced in singing and in very formal, theatrical declamation. You have to count it as a syllable when scanning French poetry, for example unless it is elided with a following vowel sound. E.g. "Al-lons en-fants de la pa-tri-e" but "Le jour de gloir(e) (-e elided, not prounouced) est ar-ri-vé." Well, actually in a sense you don't count it at the end of a line the first line is still octosyllabe even though a final -e at the end of the line makes nine syllables. But you had jolly well better sing it: it gets its own note!).

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

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Well, it really must be a misprint, Bob. That terminal ... give if it appeared before certain consonants in final position.

All this "rubbish" stuff is rubbish arising out of cross-purposes.

There is no argument (I hope) about how the feminine form of "fort" is pronounced. The original question (or one of the original questions) was how the musical term is pronounced by the French. In my experience of French musical rehearsals, they pronounce it very much as the Italians would - but they also use their own word "fort" at appropriate moments. So you might be asked to "jouer un peu plus fort" (no "t"), or possibly "jouer forte" (fortay, approx), but not "forte" (fort with t and minimal schwa).

Katy
After all, if "fort (strong point)" came from French in the 17th C, did not "fort (reinforced building, wall or ... was "the island" completely safe and unthreatened to the point that it didn't need coastal defences throught the Tudor era)?

More like, they didn't need the French to tell them how to make fortified strongholds, or to give names to them. They had enough words already.
However, without looking it up, I'd guess that where that sort of "fort" made serious inroads into English is where the French had territories in North America, the Missippi Valley and Canada and all that. The French built them and the English captured them, right? Or they got the territory in land deals.
The oldest French dictionary at ARTFL that has a military "fort":

Dictionnaire de L'Académie française, 4th Edition (1762) FORT signifie aussi Un ouvrage de terre ou de
mâçonnerie, propre à résister aux attaques de
l'ennemi. Bâtir un fort. Attaquer un fort. Prendre un fort. Il n'y a qu'un fort de terre qui défende
l'entrée du pont.

Best Donna Richoux
After all, if "fort (strong point)" came from French in ... point that it didn't need coastal defencesthrought the Tudor era)?

More like, they didn't need the French to tell them how to make fortified strongholds, or to give names to ... all that. The French built them and the English captured them, right? Or they got the territory in land deals.

But also note that English military and maritime vocabulary has for centuries drawn heavily on French. It may perhaps have stopped now, but borrowing was still going on during the 19C.
The word "fort" for a fortification short of a castle was in use in the 1500s - I surmise that it isn't a coincidence that this was about the time traditional castles became obsolete as systems of control. Many forts in N America weren't exactly the same as those elsewhere, since they were linked with trade.
In Indo-Pakistani use, though, "fort" still seems to be used for what we'd think of as a feudal castle inhabited by the nobility.

Mike.

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Well, it really must be a misprint, Bob. That terminal ... give if it appeared before certain consonants in final position.

The two words the rubbish man referred to, "porte" and "morte", are shown pronounced with the "e" silent: For example, "mort ~e" has /mOR, mORt/. Is it possible "forte" is pronounced different ways in different French speech communities?

I should ignore contrex if I were you.

Al in St. Lou