The various pronunciations of "forte" have been discussed before in these newsgroups, of course, but I'd like to ask a very specific question concerning them:
Do any of you distinguish by pronunciation between the Italian-derived adverb "forte" and the French-derived noun "forte"? If you do, could you please report which pronunciations you use for each term, using the following pronunciations spellings (based upon the entries in the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary).
"fort"
"FOR-tay"
"for-TAY"
"FOR-tee"
(If you have other pronunciations, by all means include them.)

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
1 2 3 4 5
The various pronunciations of "forte" have been discussed before in these newsgroups, of course, but I'd like to ask a ... entries in the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary). "fort" "FOR-tay" "for-TAY" "FOR-tee" (If you have other pronunciations, by all means include them.)

French strong point: /fOrt/ or /'fOrteI/, partly depending on who I'm talking to.
Italian adjective, adverb, or noun: /'fOrteI/.

Jerry Friedman
The various pronunciations of "forte" have been discussed before in these newsgroups, of course, but I'd like to ask a ... pronunciations you use for each term, using the following pronunciations spellings (based upon the entries in the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary).

I can do no more than echo with strong RightPondian agreement, the American Heritage Dictionary's comment:
.=2E.
"The word forte, coming from French fort, should properly be pronounced with one syllable, like the English word fort. Common usage, however, prefers the two-syllable pronunciation, (f=C3=B4r't=C4=81'), which has been influenced possibly by the music term forte borrowed from Italian. In a recent survey a strong majority of the Usage Panel,
74 percent, preferred the two-syllable pronunciation. The result is adelicate situation; speakers who are aware of the origin of the word may wish to continue to pronounce it as one syllable but at an increasing risk of puzzling their listeners.".
Educated UK people might say "Please be explicit. Guessing games are not my forte". They would pronounce "forte" as if it were written "FORT-tay", with the emphasis on the first syllable. The only people who say "peeahno fortay" for "pianoforte" are music teachers in my experience.
.=2E.
Answering your question:-
"fort"

Never. Even though I am aware of the French origin and I speak French and Italian. A "fort" in English is a building like those that the US cavalry defended against Injuns.
"FOR-tay"

Like this. If I were saying eg "pianoforte" I would pronounce it all'italiano, trilled 'r' and all, and damn the funny looks.
"for-TAY" "FOR-tee"

Never, ever.
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Do any of you distinguish by pronunciation between the Italian-derived ... spellings (based upon the entries in the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary).

snip
Never, ever.

Same here on all counts except "pianoforte", which to me is sufficiently naturalised in English to have lost the trill of being foreign.

Cheers, Harvey
Canadian and British English, indiscriminately mixed
Like this. If I were saying eg "pianoforte" I would pronounce it all'italiano, trilled 'r' and all, and damn the funny looks.

Same here on all counts except "pianoforte", which to me is sufficiently naturalised in English to have lost the trill of being foreign.

It's a jokey affectation I am rather fond of perpetrating.
I should have written,
The only people **apart from me** who say "peeahno forrrtay" for "pianoforte" are music teachers in my
experience.
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Do any of you distinguish by pronunciation between the Italian-derived adverb "forte" and the French-derived noun "forte"? If you do, ... each term, using the following pronunciations spellings (based upon the entries in the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary). "fort" "FOR-tay" "for-TAY" "FOR-tee"

"FOR-tay", always.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
I should have written, The only people **apart from me** who say "peeahno forrrtay" for "pianoforte" are music teachers in my experience.

I'm quite fond of listening to people playing the softloud.

I knew a choir director years ago who insisted on addressing the women singers as "soprani" and "alti"; what was particularly annoying was that he didn't Italianise the male terms. (If he wanted to be all poncey, the least he could've done was to be consistent in his affectations.)

Cheers, Harvey
Canadian and British English, indiscriminately mixed
the least he could've done was to be consistent in his affectations.)

Exactly.
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