Why do American speakers of English have so much difficulty pronouncing the Spanish letter "a" in the name Diaz when they don't have any whatsoever with it in names like Douglas, Thomas, Caesar. Neither do they seem to have trouble with it when saying: "buenos dias".

Why do Hispanics who are learning English persist in saying "S" when pronouncing such names as Stanton, Steve? They don't say "S" when the letter appears in Spanish. They simply pronounce the letter. So why the change?
Radrook
Why do American speakers of English have so much difficulty pronouncing the Spanish letter "a" in the name Diaz when they don't have any whatsoever with it in names like Douglas, Thomas, Caesar. Neither do they seem to have trouble with it when saying: "buenos dias".

Certain pronunciations get stuck and there is nothing you can do about it.
RadrookWhy do Hispanics who are learning English persist in saying "S" when pronouncing such names as Stanton, Steve? They don't say "S" when the letter appears in Spanish. They simply pronounce the letter. So why the change?
No established Spanish word begins with an "impure S", that is a word beginning with "S" followed by a consonant. Spanish speakers find combinations such as "st" and "sp" difficult to articulate, just as non-Spanish speakers have difficulty with the correct articulation of a Spanish intervocalic "b/v". A lot of English people have difficulty with the combination "sr" as found in many South Asian languages. You often hear "Scri Lanka" or "Shri" Lanka". In fact in Spanish an "e" is always articulated before adopted words beginning with "S+consonant" and some are even written with it e.g. esprínter.

Thanx for clearing that up about the Spanish speakers' "s" difficulties.
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I should have mentioned that the Spanish for "Spain" is "España".
RadrookWhy do Hispanics who are learning English persist in saying "S" when pronouncing such names as Stanton, Steve? They don't say "S" when the letter appears in Spanish. They simply pronounce the letter. So why the change?

Well, English has similar case, too. Like the letter "W" in "write", for example.