How is "Mbyte" pronounced?
Is there anyone pronouncing it as "m byte", when it is supposed to mean "1024 Kbytes", but as "mega-byte", when it is supposed to mean "1000 Kbytes"?
Is it only correct to write "1000 bytes" or would it also be allowed to write "1000 byte"? (Such a kind of plural is possible in German.)
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How is "Mbyte" pronounced? Is there anyone pronouncing it as "m byte", when it is supposed to mean "1024 Kbytes", but as "mega-byte", when it is supposed to mean "1000 Kbytes"?

No. People who mean exactly 1000 kb rather
than 1024 kb are obligated to say so specially.
(This is a convention of approx. 1985-90, now
widely used.)
The common word is megabyte, pronounced
megabyte and commonly written as Mb (an
abbreviation.) Mbyte is not in current use in
speech or writing. It is not an accepted English
word, thus has no correct English pronunciation.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
How is "Mbyte" pronounced? Is there anyone pronouncing it as ... as "mega-byte", when it is supposed to mean "1000 Kbytes"?

No. People who mean exactly 1000 kb rather than 1024 kb are obligated to say so specially. (This is a ... in current use in speech or writing. It is not an accepted English word, thus has no correct English pronunciation.

Not quite. Mb is an abbreviation for megabit. (see also: Mbit) MB is the international abbreviation for megabyte. m.
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and commonly written as Mb (an abbreviation.)

Wrong. "Mb" means megabit. "MB" means megabyte.
-Paul
Is there anyone pronouncing it as "m byte", when it ... as "mega-byte", when it is supposed to mean "1000 Kbytes"?

No. People who mean exactly 1000 kb rather than 1024 kb are obligated to say so specially. (This is a convention of approx. 1985-90, now widely used.)

My question was actually meant to be read as:
... but as "mega-byte", when it is supposed
to mean "100 bytes"?
(I assume that your answer applies to this, too.)
Is anyone using the pronunciation "kay-byte" instead of "kilo-byte" for "Kbyte" (for "1024 bytes")? If so, can this scheme be extended to "Mbytes" and so?
No. People who mean exactly 1000 kb rather than 1024 ... (This is a convention of approx. 1985-90, now widely used.)

My question was actually meant to be read as: ... but as "mega-byte", when it is supposed to mean "100 bytes"? (I assume that your answer applies to this, too.)


To reduce the confusion and distinguish between meaning (1) and (2) above, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), adopted an international standard in December 1998 which reserves the term megabyte for
106 bytes and introduces the new term mebibyte (abbreviated as MiB) for 220bytes. Similarly, the terms kibibyte (KiB, equal to 210 bytes) and gibibyte (GiB, equal to 230 bytes) were introduced. These naming convention, while strongly endorsed by IEEE and CIPM, have not yet been widely accepted, and are simply ignored by most people.
m.
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My question was actually meant to be read as: ... ... bytes"? (I assume that your answer applies to this, too.)

To reduce the confusion and distinguish between meaning (1) and (2) above, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), adopted an ... strongly endorsed by IEEE and CIPM, have not yet been widely accepted, and are simply ignored by most people. m.

The 3 digit numbers above should read 10 to the 6, 2 to the 20 etc. The superscript did not copy across, of course.
m.
To reduce the confusion and distinguish between meaning (1) and (2) above, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), adopted an international standard in December 1998 which reserves the term megabyte for 106 bytes and introduces the new term mebibyte (abbreviated as MiB) for 220 bytes.

I am aware of this standard, but would like to know about the usage in the times before it was adopted.

In the 1980ies, did computer technicians, when they want to refer to 1024 bytes, pronounce the "Kbyte" as
"kay byte" or "kilo byte", and the "Mbyte" (1048576 bytes) as "m byte" or as "mega byte"?
To reduce the confusion and distinguish between meaning (1) and ... introduces the new term mebibyte (abbreviated as MiB) for220 bytes.

I am aware of this standard, but would like to know about the usage in the times before it was ... the "Kbyte" as "kay byte" or "kilo byte", and the "Mbyte" (1048576 bytes) as "m byte" or as "mega byte"?

Sorry, I don't know the answer to this.
m.
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