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How would you read out the following numbers?

2,684 ft? Would you say 26 hundred and 84 or two thousand six hundred and eighty four feet?
How about any other four digit number?
I believe the four digit numbers with only the two first digits significant are read by first reading the first two digits followed by hundred e.g. 8,400 is read 84-hundred. But how do you read four digit numbers with three or four significant digits e.g. 5,280 or 7,435?

How about 1,415,926,535? Would you read it as 1 billion, 4 hundred and 15 million, 9 hundred and 26 thousand, 5 hundred and 35? My English teacher (he’s English) taught that the British pronounce these and's, but Americans do not. I’m, however, not convinced since I have heard Americans say things like: the year 2-thousand and 9.

Finally, the decimal numbers? Would you read the number 0.8320671 as (oh/naught) point eight three two oh/zero six seven one? My English teacher says the digits after the decimal point are read separately, but once again I’m not completely convinced.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
In British English one would say all the "ands" which you have asked about. Thus: two thousand six hundred and eighty four. I believe that American (and it seems Canadian) English is different.

Americans may well make an exception for the year.

I also agree with your English teacher as far as the decimals are concerned. At least for British English.
Hi Charlene,

I really had no intention of being unkind or of making fun of you, so I'm sorry that you feel that was my aim.

I hope that you will continue to participate in the Forum, and look forward to reading your comments in other threads.

Best wishes again, Clive
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So to recap, four digit numbers with two significant digits are usually read by first reading the first two digits and adding hundred, but this is a bit informal? I didn't really get a clear picture of whether in the same kind of informal situation you can read four digit numbers with four significant digits the same way e.g. seventeen hundred and seventy-six five feet, and would you use the word ‘and'. By the way, this way of reading the number was OK with my English teacher (the English one), he said it doesn't matter which way you read the number as long as it's under 2,000, but four digit numbers greater than that he always reads as A-thousand, B-hundred and CD regardless of the number of significant digits.

Is reading the number as AB-hundred really that informal? It seems to be formal enough to be used on the CBS Evening News.

"The Dow Jones Industrial average closed Friday at just under ninety-five hundred"

Evening News Online, 10.04.09

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=5362709n 11'35" (If you can stand the ads)
Hi,

So to recap, four digit numbers with two significant digits are usually read by first reading the first two digits and adding hundred, but this is a bit informal? Yes.

I didn't really get a clear picture of whether in the same kind of informal situation you can read four digit numbers with four significant digits the same way e.g. seventeen hundred and seventy-six five feet, Yes, you can and would you use the word ‘and'. I would, some people wouldn't

We also say simply 'seventeen seventy six'.

How you say it is also influenced by the context.

eg is the number just a number (eg 3756), or is it accompanied by units (eg 3756 eggs)?

By the way, this way of reading the number was OK with my English teacher (the English one), he said it doesn't matter which way you read the number as long as it's under 2,000, but four digit numbers greater than that he always reads as A-thousand, B-hundred and CD regardless of the number of significant digits. I don't consider 2000 a significant threshold.

Is reading the number as AB-hundred really that informal? It seems to be formal enough to be used on the CBS Evening News.Depends on whether you consider CBS news to be formal. Emotion: stick out tongue

"The Dow Jones Industrial average closed Friday at just under ninety-five hundred"

Evening News Online, 10.04.09

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=5362709n 11'35" (If you can stand the ads)

Best wishes, Clive
I think you may be asking for explicit, black and white answers, to questions which don't lend themselves to such answers. There seem to be two problems in that there are:

*Differences between British and American usages.
*Differences in formality/register.

Personally, and as far as British English is concerned, I would always use the "ands".
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Perhaps that's the Canadian spelling for "embarrass"?

As Clive pointed out, people commenting -- and looking -- here have numerous degrees in various fields.

In my American schools, I was taught in my math classes (which practice carried all the way through senior math seminar in college), that "and" is never spoken in a number, that the decimal is read as, "point", and that the numerals following same, are simply read in sequence. (Consider what you can buy at the hardware store for "long-hand" versions of numbers. There's never an "and" in there!) An excellent example of the non-utility of your suggestion of reading a decimal as a fraction is posted later on this page, where the decimal portion is 6 or 7 places (and so not readily or handily convertible to a 1,000,000th place, or so. How would you refer to a repeating decimal -- fractionally? How do you find books in the library under the Dewey Decimal call number system? Do you go to Biography at 921, and locate the book 921.137 at "nine hundred twenty-one, and 137/1,000ths", or do you find it at "nine twenty-one point one three seven."?

You can either read a decimal as a decimal, or convert it to a fraction. But you don't mix the two. The decimal represents the conversion of a fraction.
2,684 is pronounced; two thousand six hundred eighty-four, the use of "and" is not correct.
1,415,926,535 is pronounced; one billion four hundred fifteen million nine hundred twenty-six thousand five hundred thirty- five. Also, the use of and is not correct, this is true no matter how large the number. And is only used when pronouncing dollar amounts such as; $2,684.01 would be pronounced; two thousand six hundred eighty-four dollars and one cent.
Hi,

I don't think you have read the comments earlier in this thread about the use of 'and' in British English. Emotion: smile

Clive
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The problem as I see it, if you consider this to be one, is not the way you pronounce the numbers but rather your example is not one billion in UK English as one billion = a million millions, therefore 12 zeros
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