I happened to catch an old Warner Bros. cartoon, from the 'Forties I'm guessing, starring Daffy Duck and Porky Pig, where Daffy Duck was Robin Hood and Porky was Friar Tuck. As both characters, Mel Blanc pronounced "Robin Hood" with stress on "Hood". To me, however, the normal pronunciation of "Robin Hood" is "ROBINhood", receiving a stress pattern like single-word -hood terms (e.g. "brotherhood"). IOW, it's like the legendary Fort Leonard Wood that AUErs with military experience have said so much about.
"Robin HOOD" sounds like a BrE pronunciation it reminds me of how BrE speakers pronounce "Amsterdam" as "AmsterDAM", while in AmE it's "AMsterdam". But Mel Blanc was American, of course, as were Daffy and Porky. So was "Robin Hood" a few generations ago standardly pronounced "Robin HOOD" in AmE? Are there AmE speakers even today who say "Robin HOOD" rather than "ROBinhood"?
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re: ROBin Hood vs Robin HOOD
"Robin HOOD" sounds like a BrE pronunciation it reminds me of how BrE speakers pronounce "Amsterdam" as "AmsterDAM", while ... ago standardly pronounced "Robin HOOD" in AmE? Are there AmE speakers even today who say "Robin HOOD" rather than "ROBinhood"?

I think the usual practice with names is to stress the surname rather than the given John SMITH, rather than JOHN Smith so I wonder if the given-name stress in this case was the result of the television theme song, and that this altered the usual practice?

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
"Robin HOOD" sounds like a BrE pronunciation it reminds ... speakers even today who say "Robin HOOD" rather than "ROBinhood"?

I think the usual practice with names is to stress the surname rather than the given John SMITH, rather ... given-name stress in this case was the result of the television theme song, and that this altered the usual practice?

I can comment on only the way it was pronounced from about
1928 on, but all I've ever heard has been "ROBin Hood".

I think the reason people pronounce it that way is that we don't think of it as a first name and a last name, but as if it were all one word.
It just doesn't seem right to think that there could have been a Mr and Mrs Hood who had sons Samuel, Clarence, and Robin.
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I happened to catch an old Warner Bros. cartoon, from the 'Forties I'm guessing, starring Daffy Duck and Porky Pig, ... ago standardly pronounced "Robin HOOD" in AmE? Are there AmE speakers even today who say "Robin HOOD" rather than "ROBinhood"?

Yes, it's always "Robin HOOD" in BrE (and, as Areff says, AmsterDAM).

Alan Jones
I happened to catch an old Warner Bros. cartoon, from the 'Forties I'm guessing, starring Daffy Duck and Porky Pig, ... ago standardly pronounced "Robin HOOD" in AmE? Are there AmE speakers even today who say "Robin HOOD" rather than "ROBinhood"?

OK, I am sitting here after a very good lunch to celebrate a friend's sixtith birthday (and my husband assures me I have drunk at least a bottle and a half of very good vintage champagne) but neither Amsterdam not Robin Hood have any specific stress as far as this Brit is concerned.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
I happened to catch an old Warner Bros. cartoon, from the 'Forties I'm guessing, starring Daffy Duck and Porky Pig, ... Porky was Friar Tuck. As both characters, Mel Blanc pronounced "Robin Hood" with stress on "Hood". To me, however, the

He may have been having a play on the second meaning of "hood" - as in hoodlum...
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I can comment on only the way it was pronounced from about 1928 on, but all I've ever heard has ... right to think that there could have been a Mr and Mrs Hood who had sons Samuel, Clarence, and Robin.

I concur. I think we think of "Robin Hood" as a kind of superhero like "Superman". I'm point Richard made about stress on last names really clears things up for me as to why the British pronounce it differently. This kind of info is why I love groups like AUE. I can say I gave it much thought before.
Larry
snip
"Robin HOOD" sounds like a BrE pronunciation it reminds ... speakers even today who say "Robin HOOD" rather than "ROBinhood"?

OK, I am sitting here after a very good lunch to celebrate a friend's sixtith birthday (and my husband assures ... good vintage champagne) but neither Amsterdam not Robin Hood have any specific stress as far as this Brit is concerned.

Glad to hear you're feeling particuarly unstressed at the moment, Laura..
I wonder if this is an "ear" thing: if one stresses a certain syllable, the absence of any pronounced syllabic stress can sound like opposite stress rather than equal stress.
When I lived in Canada, the first syllable of "weekend" was definitely stressed (WEE-kend). When I first heard the relatively even stress of "week-end" in the UK, it sounded like "week-END" to my ear.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
I happened to catch an old Warner Bros. cartoon, from the 'Forties I'm guessing, starring Daffy Duck and Porky Pig, ... ago standardly pronounced "Robin HOOD" in AmE? Are there AmE speakers even today who say "Robin HOOD" rather than "ROBinhood"?

Depends whether or not they say GEORGE-Bush, as in "gooseberry bush". It's always bugged me, not so much that they do this ridiculous ROBIN-Hood thing, as that I can't begin to find a reason for it. It's all too MICKEY-Mouse. Any explanation, even if true, will be welcome.

Mike.
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