Yesterday I watched the Queen's speech and heard her say ('tra:nspo:t) for "transport", twice. That's not RP, so is it a common variant of ('tr&nspo:t) or a posh thing?
Bye, FB

"Che cos'รจ un fallo da tergo? E non stiamo parlando della tua vita privata."
(Intervista della Gialappa's Band a Elisabetta Canalis)
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Yesterday I watched the Queen's speech and heard her say ('tra:nspo:t) for "transport", twice. That's not RP, so is it a common variant of ('tr&nspo:t) or a posh thing?

It sounds like RP to me.

Katy Jennison
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Yesterday I watched the Queen's speech and heard her say ('tra:nspo:t) for "transport", twice. That's not RP, so is it a common variant of ('tr&nspo:t) or a posh thing?

I think both forms are found in varieties which are regarded as RP. I would tend to find the form with (AEmotion: smile "posher", depending on other features of the accent.
I say it with the "cat" vowel ((a) not Emotion: dog), of course, but the distribution of the "cat" and "father" vowels in words like "bath", "grass", "chance" etc. is my accent's most obvious departure from RP.

Jonathan
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Yesterday I watched the Queen's speech and heard her say ... it a common variant of ('tr&nspo:t) or a posh thing?

I think both forms are found in varieties which are regarded as RP. I would tend to find the form with (AEmotion: smile "posher", depending on other features of the accent.

I'm sorry, you're both right. I should have checked the SOED, which does show both pronunciations.
Bye, FB

"Something to take to the country." (holding out a bunch of flowers) "Flowers come from the country, Charles."
(Cold Comfort Farm, the film)
Yesterday I watched the Queen's speech and heard her say ... it a common variant of ('tr&nspo:t) or a posh thing?

I think both forms are found in varieties which are regarded as RP. I would tend to find the form with (AEmotion: smile "posher", depending on other features of the accent.

Really? I'd say the complete opposite, since I've always seen "trahnsport" as a characteristic feature of the speech of Thatcheresque arrivistes of the Miss Slocombe variety. I used to live and work around lots of Sloanes of the Honorable-this and Lady-that variety (in other words, the posher end of RP), and I never heard any of them use it or "plahstic", either.

Ross Howard
I think both forms are found in varieties which are ... with (AEmotion: smile "posher", depending on other features of the accent.

Really? I'd say the complete opposite, since I've always seen "trahnsport" as a characteristic feature of the speech of Thatcheresque ... other words, the posher end of RP), and I never heard any of them use it or "plahstic", either.

What about "sahmple"?
Adrian
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I think both forms are found in varieties which are ... with (AEmotion: smile "posher", depending on other features of the accent.

Really? I'd say the complete opposite, since I've always seen "trahnsport" as a characteristic feature of the speech of Thatcheresque ... other words, the posher end of RP), and I never heard any of them use it or "plahstic", either.

My experience is the same as Ross Howard's: Emotion: dog (or something like ([email protected])) in the various trans- words and "plastic", though it's (AEmotion: smile in "plaster". "Transatlantic" has two Emotion: dog vowels in posh RP (or "hyperlect", to use John Honey's more elegant term). I can't guess why HM prefers (AEmotion: smile.

Alan Jones
I think both forms are found in varieties which are ... with (AEmotion: smile "posher", depending on other features of the accent.

Really? I'd say the complete opposite, since I've always seen "trahnsport" as a characteristic feature of the speech of Thatcheresque ... other words, the posher end of RP), and I never heard any of them use it or "plahstic", either.

You may well be right, and you clearly have more experience of that sort of accent than I do, although this does leave the question of what the Queen is doing using it.
My instincts (as a non-"bahth" speaker) are that "plahstic" is more outside the mainstream than "trahnsport" is, but they may be wrong.

Jonathan
You may well be right, and you clearly have more experience of that sort of accent than I do, although this does leave the question of what the Queen is doing using it.

Answer: The Queen *is* Miss Slocombe, but with corgis instead of a ***. And an even worse dress sense.

Ross Howard
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