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Hello, everyone!

I believe I have finally learned how to pronounce the /j/ sound. I would gladly share my progress with you all, but the audio feature isn't working for me.

However, I still have some trouble pronouncing it when it follows some consonants, specially t and d.

I have noticed that the the /j/ sound sometimes "mix" with the t and d, and other consonants, too. For example: Did you (Didju), What you (Watchu), Bless You(Bleshu).

I would like to know how common that is. For instance, most people don't say hard year as "hardjear", or what year as "watchear". How weird would it be if I pronounced it that way?

Also, what should I do when the /j/ comes after a n? Should I place my tongue in it's usual position (let's say position 0) and then pronounce the /j/, or should I just press the tongue against the roof of the mouth right after i pronounce the n (one year, for example)?

Thank you all for your patience.

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As for "one year" - yes, after putting your tongue at the roof of your mouth for the 'n' in the word 'one', keep your tongue up at the roof of your mouth and then propel your tongue off the roof of your mouth to create the 'y' sound for 'year'.

Native speakers have the luxury of mixing sounds as in "didju" for 'did you'. I would advise non natives to NOT do that. There is no reason for a non native to try to mimic the sounds a native uses. Why do I say this? Native speakers need all the help we can get when listening to accented English. (Even when I listen to a native speaker from Ireland, I need to concentrate!) Also, when a non native speaks English with clear diction, it sounds elegant and well educated.

Let me know if you have any more questions...

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JoaozinI have noticed that the the /j/ sound sometimes "mix" with the t and d, and other consonants, too. For example: Did you (Didju), What you (Watchu), Bless You(Bleshu). I would like to know how common that is.

It's as common as mud. Emotion: smile

For more on the topic of glide absorption, see what is the pronounce of want you/ don`t you/ thought you, and follow the four links given there.

Joaozinmost people don't say hard year as "hardjear", or what year as "watchear". How weird would it be if I pronounced it that way?

True, they don't. That would be very weird. It's only the really common combinations that undergo glide absorption. "hard year" and "what year" just are not common enough. Besides, and more to the point, "What...?" already has the casual pronunciation /wʌʔ/ or /wʌt̚/ so there's no /t/ left to join with the glide /j/ in "year". Lastly, glide absorption is almost always from a stressed syllable to an unstressed syllable, and these two expressions have the reverse stress pattern.

CJ

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  

Thanks for answering, I really appreciate it!

I do have one more question, although it's unrelated to the previous ones.

Is there a difference between don't you and do not you?

If I were to ask, for example, wether or not someone enjoys my company, which one would be correct: "don't you like my company?" or " do you not like my company?" Perhaps even "you don't like my company?"

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Joaozin...

Is there a difference between don't you and do not you?

If I were to ask, for example, wether or not someone enjoys my company, which one would be correct: "don't you like my company?" or " do you not like my company?" Perhaps even "you don't like my company?"

You form a question through subject-verb inversion. In modern English the word "not" cannot be involved in inversion of this kind unless it is attached as "n't" to another verb.

You do not like ... (statement)
You don't like ... (statement)

Corresponding question forms. These are correct because here you've carried only ONE word across the subject ("don't" counts as one word here):

Do you not like ...? (very formal question)
Don't you like ...? (normal question)

Do not you like ...? is wrong because you've carried TWO words across the subject, "do" and "not".


Though it's used much less often, you can ask a question with the word order of a statement.

You [do not / don't] like ...?

CJ