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Is it true that the adverb of frequency can be used at the end of a sentence when it follows an intransitive verb or a direct object of the subject.
  • He speaks seldom.
  • I visit her frequently.
What's wrong with;
  • He seldom speaks.
GB
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Comments  (Page 2) 
CalifJim
There are no rules about adverbs.
*Always I enjoy funny movies.
I always enjoy funny movies.
*I enjoy always funny movies.
*I enjoy funny always movies.
*I enjoy funny movies always.

*Always he is late.
?He always is late.
He is always late.
*He is late always.

*Always he has done it that way.
?He always has done it that way.
He has always done it that way.
*He has done always it that way.
*He has done it always that way.
*He has done it that always way.
*He has done it that way always.

Well ... idon't know what the rules say, exactly, but what i've infered from your above emntioned examples is that always happens before the main verb more frequently that it does after the operator.
Can you also tell me what verb phrase adverbs are. I have searched it on the internet but couldn't find any good example.
GB
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Maybe it's easier to think of it this way.
1. Place always after the first verb when there are two or more verbs in the verb phrase. (always "in the middle")
2. Place always before the verb when there is only one verb (always "before")
3. Exception to 2: Place always after a form of to be. (always "after")

1. They have always wanted to buy a house. We can always try again tomorrow. Dave will always say what's on his mind. You have always been kind to me.
2. I always enjoy serious movies. He always makes a mistake in the division. They always get what they want. We always do that step last.
3. I am always late. Kate and Jerry were always the smartest ones in the class. Mr. Smith is always ready to help.

CJ
Verb-phrase adverbs are adverbs that modify the meaning of the predicate of the sentence only, as opposed to sentence adverbs, which modify the meaning of the whole sentence.

Certainly we can write English well.


certainly is a sentence adverb. It says something about the whole sentence. This is certain: [We can write English well.]
well is a verb-phrase adverb. It says something about the verb (and its complements, if any). How can we write English? In what manner do we write English? How is the writing of English done? Well.

CJ
CalifJim
For a native it is far easier
I often wonder if that is true! Especially when it comes to explaining it all. Emotion: smile

CJ
The trouble with a native is that they have a "natural" feeling, but for those who want to learn language that is not helpful. For a native it is very difficult to explain why something is the way it is, because they know how it is and really never thought about why. Nevertheless, event they follow the logical pattern, but usually they cannot discern it. The rules I know are almost without an exception regarded as advanced, but there is nothing advanced in them. You definitely should be relatively smarter in order to follow them, but if you want to learn a new language that is a premise, isn't it.

However, the logic behind the grammar rules must be relatively simple, because not all people in UK or USA or Australia... are geniuses and they all speak the language using, even if local, the group of logical guidelines.

When you learn a foreign language you have rules and tests that strictly follow these rules. However, absurd is that when a native tries to solve these tests they make sometimes even more mistakes than those who learn the language. Sorry, but what language a foreigner wants to learn then, some foreign variant of English? Or maybe Brits or Americans are so proud of their knowledge of English that foreigners are forbidden to enter the realm of higher society. I am ironic here slightly. Back to the track.

The position of adverb is to be decided upon their logic and effect. There are groups of adverbs based on their function that are commonly positioned before a verb, after a verb, before a auxiliary verb... This is not something you have to learn by heart (some things you have to, though, like: I am, you are, he is, it is... because that is easier than to read and remember the book about the origin "am" "are" "is"...) but you have to be aware that they do have their normal position.

Here is an example

I hit.

I hit hard. is OK

I hard hit. is not OK, but not just because the rule says that hard must go after the verb

The reason is that if you place hard before hit, there is a great confusion about hit: is it a verb or it is a noun. I [what] hard hit

I hit very hard. is OK

I hit so hard. is OK

I hit the ball.

I hit the ball hard. is OK

I hit hard the ball. is not usual

The place of hard between hit and the ball is not common because the object the ball is usually more important for the action to hit than the adverb hard. However, I can create a sentence when this position is acceptable

I hit hard the ball, but I was very soft with his face.

What I am saying is that while anyone reads about the position of a typical adverb it is advisable to try to figure out what could be the reason for such rule. Soon or later the logic is going to pop out. The rules are only the extraction of the logic you usually and unfortunately have to find for yourself. You can't memorize a complete grammar of any language - nobody can.

However, to pass that test one has to follow the given guidelines as long as it one's to bear. In some such cases I can't help, because for several rules there is no general agreement about the grammar rules and it is up to their school, teacher or literature. Worst of all I can give a wrong instruction because in my literature it says something else or I might not understand the problem.

So here are the two examples of a frequency adverb to complete the story

She seldom speaks while she drives a car.

She speaks seldom in her car.

[People in the forums constantly ask "which answer is correct and why". I am talking here about their need to know why and almost without an exception you can find why.]
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so it means that when it comes to the positioning of the adverbs, one has to figure out the significance of the subject of the matter. So, adverbs not only modify the verbs but also show that what is being emphasized by the speaker/writer.
Am i right?

GB
AperisicHowever, the logic behind the grammar rules must be relatively simple, because not all people in UK or USA or Australia... are geniuses and they all speak the language using, even if local, the group of logical guidelines.

Grammar can be quite complicated. But it is unconscious knowledge, which is why native speakers cannot articulate the rules, and also why intelligence usually has no bearing on how well a speaker can use the rules. Language could be compared to walking. It is unconsciously acquired and used.
I hit hard the ball.

This is not a question of unusual. This is not a question of uncommon.
This is a question of totally, entirely, and absolutely incorrect.
Almost nothing will reveal a speaker of English as foreign as easily as this completely un-English construction.

CJ
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Alienvoord
AperisicHowever, the logic behind the grammar rules must be relatively simple, because not all people in UK or USA or Australia... are geniuses and they all speak the language using, even if local, the group of logical guidelines.

Grammar can be quite complicated. But it is unconscious knowledge, which is why native speakers cannot articulate the rules, and also why intelligence usually has no bearing on how well a speaker can use the rules. Language could be compared to walking. It is unconsciously acquired and used.
I personally had and have been on both sides of the fence and certainly can appreciate the difficulty the learners are experiencing. What you said is absolutely true. Learners unfortunately are often baffled as to why certain phases or sentence structures are the way they are and difficult to explain. Because of the grammar structure is so different from one’s culture to English, most learns therefore will suffer from confusion about how to correctly form sentences which sound native. The word “hard” and “hardly” had confused me for a good long time. For instance, “he has worked very hard to improve his grades”. “Hard” is used as an adverb in a positive annotation. “He has hardly done anything to improve his grades”. Hardly which is a derivative of the word [hard] is also used as an adverb but in a negative annotation. So between the two I was using them wrong which absolutely changed the meaning from that was intended. Word placement in a sentence may come naturally for the natives. But for learners, the confusion is like untying a spool of white thread which requires relentless patience and determination.
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