I am working on a "simple" computer program to convert numbers to long form english.
My goal here is to produce "proper english" output. At present I am unable to locate anything with a definitive explanation of how best to represent this. I've found a few pages with a few rules and incorporated as much as I can.
Here are some examples:
1001 - one thousand and one (this seems appropriate to me)

$1,121,001.50 - one million, one hundred and twenty-one thousand and one dollars and fifty cents (the last half of this is questionable)

I'd like to be correct here, so I've provided a URL to test the program:

http://www30.brinkster.com/hirerob/english/numerical.asp?1000

For different values, change the 1000 after the question mark to $2000 or $2123.50 or 1,200,323,323, or nearly any number up to about 900 digits long. As an aside, at the present time, I am not certain that very large numbers are correctly translated, and decimal points that are not dollar values are currently ignored.
I'd greatly appreciate your insight into the appropriate way to express numbers as words.
Thank you in advance for your expertise,
Rob Lindman
Web Developer (Looking for work, BTW)
http://www.roblindman.com /
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My goal here is to produce "proper english" output. At present I am unable to locate anything with a definitive ... as much as I can. Here are some examples: 1001 - one thousand and one (this seems appropriate to me)

This has been discussed here on aue ad nauseum; see http://google.com/groups?q=group : usage+"hundred+and"

Michael Hamm NB: Of late, my e-mail address is being AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis 'spoofed' a bit. That is, spammers send (Email Removed) e-mail that seems to be from me. Please http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ realize that no spam is in fact from me.
I am working on a "simple" computer program to convert numbers to long form english. My goal here is to ... as much as I can. Here are some examples: 1001 - one thousand and one (this seems appropriate to me)

In the U.S., we are taught that your words indicate "1000.1". "1001" is "one thousand, one".
$1,121,001.50 - one million, one hundred and twenty-one thousand and one dollars and fifty cents (the last half of this is questionable)

Omit the first "and".
Bill
Swap first and last parts of username and ISP for address.
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I had a nun in grammar school who was nuts about that , say and and you were wrighting the number in longhand one thousand one a thousand times.
I am working on a "simple" computer program to convert numbers to long form english. My goal here is to ... one million, one hundred and twenty-one thousand and one dollars and fifty cents (the last half of this is questionable)

So long as you are aware that American and non-American usages are different in particular with the use of 'and'. I suspect AmE would have fewer 'ands' here. BTW, doesn't 'one dollars' seem odd when you see it written!

Rob Bannister
Bill, thanks for the input.
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Rob,
Thanks for your input. Also useful to know about the differences between 'Englishes'. At present, looking to meet with American English standards.

Rob
I am working on a "simple" computer program to convert numbers to long form english. My goal here is to ... express numbers as words. Thank you in advance for your expertise, Rob Lindman Web Developer (Looking for work, BTW) http://www.roblindman.com /

First: There is no good way to write very large numbers as words. In the USA, a "billion" is 1.0e+9, but in some other countries it is
1.0e+12. However, I hear that in England and Australia it usuallymeans 1.0e+9. Besides, large numbers might not really "need" names. I ask you, as a computer programmer, how would you read aloud 0x100? I think it would be "one zero zero zero zero hex".
Second: Your program has bugs. To see bugs, try these amounts: $0 and $1.01. Also, can it handle negative amounts? Should $13.999 be rounded down, or up, or rejected?
Third: Rules for informal speech may not be the same as rules for formal writing. I think that in speech, 101 is read as "a hundred and one" or "one-oh-one", but in (formal) written language, it is "one hundred one".
Second: Your program has bugs. To see bugs, try these amounts: $0 and $1.01.

Actually any number of cents less than 10 causes an incorrect - sign before the last word.
Third: Rules for informal speech may not be the same as rules for formal writing. I think that in speech, 101 is read as "a hundred and one" or "one-oh-one", but in (formal) written language, it is "one hundred one".

US usage only though. Any routine like this to be useful needs to be able to do it either way.
Likewise the dash between twenty/thirty/fourty etc. and one/two/three etc.

I tried 100 0's hoping for 'one google dollars'.
Instead I got
ten duotrigintillion dollars
I should be set up for life now that I know how to write that on a cheque.
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