+0
Hi,

1. I thought the names of newspaper and magazines normally, if not always, have the definite article 'the' in front of them but I didn't see it for these. Why is that?

Participating in the events were Pelle Tornberg, president and CEO of Metro International, and Shinichi Hakoshima, president of the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun.

The poll was released to the public only days after Newsweek magazine made ...

2. I thought the names of public or private organizations that can be read in their individual letters usually, if not always, have the definite article 'the' but why is it not here -- as used in a possessive case?

ZZZ's stand on this issue is very reassuring to the resdents. -- I think we can use any other high-profile names other than 'ZZZ'.

Why not, "the ZZZ's stand on this issue is very reassuring to the residents"? Why is it seem to take a different course of action when used possessively?
+0
Hi,

1. I thought the names of newspaper and magazines normally, if not always, have the definite article 'the' in front of them but I didn't see it for these. Why is that? Offhand, I'd say that may be true of newspapers, but not of magazines. eg We speak of the magazines Life and Time and Fortune and Newsweek.

Participating in the events were Pelle Tornberg, president and CEO of Metro International,<<< sounds like a company and Shinichi Hakoshima, president of the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun. A lot of papers have 'The' as part of their actual proper name. Maybe Japan is different. I dunno.

The poll was released to the public only days after Newsweek magazine made ...

2. I thought the names of public or private organizations that can be read in their individual letters usually, <<< You mean like IBM? if not always, have the definite article 'the' but why is it not here -- as used in a possessive case?

ZZZ's stand on this issue is very reassuring to the resdents. -- I think we can use any other high-profile names other than 'ZZZ'. You mean like IBM?

Why not, "the ZZZ's stand on this issue is very reassuring to the residents"? Why is it seem to take a different course of action when used possessively? IBM is a big company. IBM's reputation is good. Where's the problem here?

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you, Clive.

I think my problem lies with the fact that as it seems, proper names like IBM that can be pronounced I, B, and M separately in their individual letters usually have the definite article 'the' in front of them when used in normal sententical context, but when used as a possessive case like "IBM's representatives," the definite article seems no where to be found. Why is that?

IBM's representatives had gathered in ....

Why not "The IBM's representatives had gathered in ..."?
Hi,

I think my problem lies with the fact that as it seems, proper names like IBM that can be pronounced I, B, and M separately in their individual letters usually have the definite article 'the' in front of them when used in normal sententical context, <<<< What gives you this idea? Sounds odd to me. Can you offer an example? but when used as a possessive case like "IBM's representatives," the definite article seems no where to be found. Why is that?

IBM's representatives had gathered in ....

Clive

Why not "The IBM's representatives had gathered in ..."?
Thank you again, Clive.

I think I saw in a past post or two that talked about those organizations with what you could call abbreviated names. As far as I can recall, they seem to have said names like IBM, which can be pronounced separately in individual alphabet letters, should be preceded by the definite article "the" in most sentential situations. I think they also mentioned that names like "NASA" which we do not normally say its individual alphabet letters separately do not need to be preceded by the definite article "the".

Would you these with the"THEs" are not correct?

He worked at the IBM.

This company dreams of being associated with an international company with a hgh name value like the IBM.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi,

I think I saw in a past post or two that talked about those organizations with what you could call abbreviated names. As far as I can recall, they seem to have said names like IBM, which can be pronounced separately in individual alphabet letters, should be preceded by the definite article "the" in most sentential situations. <<< This does not seem correct. Perhaps you misinterpreted what was meant. I think they also mentioned that names like "NASA" which we do not normally say its individual alphabet letters separately do not need to be preceded by the definite article "the". <<< This sounds true, off hand.

Would you these with the"THEs" are not correct?

He worked at the IBM.

This company dreams of being associated with an international company with a hgh name value like the IBM.

'The IBM' is definitely wrong. Generally speaking, you wouldn't use 'the' for a company name'.

We do use 'the' in cases like 'the FBI', 'the CIA', 'the RCMP'. It seems to me that in these cases we are thinking of 'the people' in these organizations.

Best wishes, Clive