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Hi, Can I freely put the adjectives in front of proper nouns? What are some guidelines?

1. Case of with 'the':

Desert -- I think the names of deserts do take the definite article 'the'

the Sahara

Step 1: Can I put the adjective 'fabulous' in front to say the Sahara is fabulous? Then, would it become 'the fabulous Sahara'? By doing this, I feel like I am dividing up the name that shouldn't be split up -- due to it being a proper name? Is it OK to insert an adjective in between the name like the name 'the Sahara' before?

Additional question: Why is that when we write some names as I see it have their definite article in lower-case letters like this? Why is that normally you wouldn't see it as 'The Sahara' in captial letters when 'the' is good part of its name?

This poor young man lost his way and walked the smoking hot Sahara in mid-afternoon without water for hours.

Case of without 'the':

John Doe Hall -- assuming there is a hall named after a fictitious person 'John Doe', am I allowed to place 'great' or 'fabulous' in front of it?

Great/fabulous John Doe Hall is visually stunning to look at.

Then again, can I do it in front of names like this?

Look, great/fabulous Doe is walking down the street.

Then again, if that Doe happens to be well-known, it is likely to be written as:

Look, a great/fabulous Doe is walking down the street.

Why is that?
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BelieverHi, Can I freely put the adjectives in front of proper nouns? What are some guidelines?

1. Case of with 'the':

Desert -- I think the names of deserts do take the definite article 'the'

the Sahara

Step 1: Can I put the adjective 'fabulous' in front to say the Sahara is fabulous? Then, would it become 'the fabulous Sahara'? By doing this, I feel like I am dividing up the name that shouldn't be split up -- due to it being a proper name? Is it OK to insert an adjective in between the name like the name 'the Sahara' before?You can use an adjective in front of a proper noun because you are describing a noun (that just happens to be a proper noun, but a noun just the same). It would become 'the adjective Sahara'.
Additional question: Why is that when we write some names as I see it have their definite article in lower-case letters like this? Why is that normally you wouldn't see it as 'The Sahara' in captial letters when 'the' is good part of its name?
"The" is a common use word and not really a part of the name. It is the Sahara Desert - Sahara Desert is the name. It helps me to think of it as a title as the same rules apply. You wouldn't say 'give this to General' you would say 'give this to the General' even though the general's name is really General John Doe (or whatever).

This poor young man lost his way and walked the smoking hot Sahara in mid-afternoon without water for hours.
Case of without 'the':

John Doe Hall -- assuming there is a hall named after a fictitious person 'John Doe', am I allowed to place 'great' or 'fabulous' in front of it?

Great/fabulous John Doe Hall is visually stunning to look at.

Then again, can I do it in front of names like this?Yes because it describes a noun. The noun being proper is irrelevant.

Look, great/fabulous Doe is walking down the street.
Then again, if that Doe happens to be well-known, it is likely to be written as:

Look, a great/fabulous Doe is walking down the street.

Why is that?I'm not clear on this question.

Then again, if that Doe happens to be well-known, it is likely to be written as:

Look, a great/fabulous Doe is walking down the street.
["a" great/fabulous Doe] implies there are many such Does. "Look, the great Doe is walking down the street" tells you that this unique and important person is walking down the street.
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Thank you, Tyx and Feebs11

OK, I think you are right about 'the' not being part of the proper name in the case of 'the Sahara Desert'. How about the Amazon river? If I want to add some descriptive adjective to denote my appreciation for its grandeur, where should I place it? I think for 'the Amazon river', 'the' is very much a part of its name (that is its proper name).

the splendid Amazon river??

If I did that, I feel like I am splitting up a name which shouldn't be split up -- with 'the' being part of its name.

As far as I know, 'the' is part of the name of "the Amazon river', but I think I saw an answer to this question written like this. Why is that?

What is the great river that flows down the country of Brazil?

Amazon

Why not 'the Amazon'?

Or 'the Amazon river'?
Hi again

Briefly:

1. It is all right to say the fabulous Sahara

2. The is usually not capitalised in proper nouns. There are exceptions. It is often capitalised in the names of orchestras, bands, but even that is not required by any grammatical rule: When did The Beatles split up?

The shorter the name of a newspaper is, the more likely people will capitalise the article in it: He never reads The Times.

There is no fixed usage with regard to capitalising the article in proper nouns, it varies greatly in different parts of the Anglo-Saxon world.

An article is needed for John Doe if he is famous:
I met the great John Doe yesterday.

If you are talking about an unknown person whose name happens to be John Doe, you would say:
I met a John Doe yesterday.

No article is used with words like little and poor:
Little Mary helped her mother in the kitchen.

Poor John didn't know what to do in that situation.


Cheers
CB
Thank you, Cool Breeze.

Always appreciate your assistance.

Let us say that I am this desire to put down on the paper the sight of grandeur I just saw in some photos of the Amazon River (or the Amazon river?? -- when do we capitalize 'river' and when not, when search online or in print form seems to show the use of the both?), where should I put the appreciative and sort of descriptive adjective 'magnificent'? Mind you that the name seems to go by 'the Amazon River' or 'the Amazon' with 'the' very much stuck (used not in a pejorative sense) in there? Some options?

The magnificant Amazon River??

Now, as said before, am I splitting up some thing that should not be split up?
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BelieverThe magnificant Amazon River??

Now, as said before, am I splitting up some thing that should not be split up?
Hi Believer

Usage varies. As far as I am concerned, these are all correct:

the Amazon river
the Amazon River
the river Amazon
the River Amazon
the Amazon

You can put magnificent after thein all of them. No doubt some people consider some of them wrong. There is no Language Academy anywhere in the Anglo-Saxon world and that's why there are no official linguistic truths. It's a free-for-all.Emotion: smile However, I should think it's universally accepted thatall rivers take the definite article (the):

the Thames
the Rhine
the Nile
the Kymijoki River


Cheers
CB