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Can anyone help me with punctuation when the following phrases are used within a sentence:

"as well as"

"as well"

"in addition to"

"too"

Thanks
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Comments  
No commas are used before or after them.
I'd say it all depends on the context...
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If at the beginning of a sentence you would use a comma ( , ) after the phrase. if used in the middle of a sentence and both sentences would stand alone it would include a semi colon before the phrase and comma after the phrase. If only one sentence would stand alone you would use a comma before the phrase only. Examples follow

In addition, the board meeting was dry.

The board meeting was dry; in addition, jenny made really poor company.

The board meeting was dry, in addition to being a pain in the ass.

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Hi,
If at the beginning of a sentence you would use a comma ( , ) after the phrase. if used in the middle of a sentence and both sentences would stand alone it would include a semi colon before the phrase and comma after the phrase. If only one sentence would stand alone you would use a comma before the phrase only. Examples follow

In addition, the board meeting was dry. OK

The board meeting was dry; in addition, Jenny made really poor company.
This is OK, but I'd usually write it as
The board meeting was dry. In addition, Jenny made really poor company.

In termes of meaning, 'make poor company' is a social-oriented phrase that we don't normally associate witha board meeting.

The board meeting was dry, in addition to being a pain in the ass.
OK.
However, the first part sounds formal and the second part sounds very informal. They don't 'match' in register.
The phrase 'pain in the ass' is more commonly used of people than of things.

The adjective 'dry' in the above sense is not how I would today expect a meeting to be described.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi, would it be awkward or wrong to use "socially oriented" for your hyphenated part "social-oriented"? Do we often connect two adjectives (as it seems to me) with a hyphen to act as sort of a group adjective?

You wrote:

In termes of meaning, 'make poor company' is a social-oriented phrase that we don't normally associate witha board meeting.
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Hi,
I wrote in a casual manner.

Clive
That's incorrect.
Be nice to Clive.
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