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What is the proper spelling of the following?

Varsity Boys Basketball

or

Varsity Boys' Basketball

Do I need an apostrophe?

Thank you in advance for your help.
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General usage: no apostrope.
Comments  
I think typically this is spelled without the apostrophe-at least in schools in the US where I have worked for many years-simply because it is tedious to add the apostrophe each time the term is used. However, if this is the basketball team belonging to the Varsity Boys, the proper spelling would be "Boys'" and that spelling would be used for the occasional use outside of the school.
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 Philip's reply was promoted to an answer.
To be correct, you need to use the apostrophe. It is a possessive usage: the team of the boys.

If you were writing about a hat belonging to your sister, you would write: your sister's hat. You wouldn't write: your sisters hat. It is the same grammatical construction.

To excuse the omission of the apostrophe by saying it is "tedious" to include it is the equivalent of saying one doesn't need to spell words correctly because it is boring to have to look them up.

When we say boys basketball, we're not saying basketball belonging to boys. We're saying basketball played by boys. Boys is an adjective, not a possessive noun. We could technically say boy basketball, but for lack of a better phrase, that doesn't sound right.

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anonymous

When we say boys basketball, we're not saying basketball belonging to boys. We're saying basketball played by boys. Boys is an adjective, not a possessive noun. We could technically say boy basketball, but for lack of a better phrase, that doesn't sound right.

Nah. Then why do we have "men's basketball" instead of "men basketball"?

anonymousWhen we say boys basketball, we're not saying basketball belonging to boys.

Even though the form with an apostrophe is called "the possessive form", it is used for other reasons. Possession does not have to be involved. For example, in an hour's work the work does not belong to the hour.

anonymousBoys is an adjective

It sure looks like a plural nounto me. Emotion: smile

We don't say "boys, boyser, boysest" as you can do with adjectives, e.g., "sad, sadder, saddest".

anonymousthat doesn't sound right.

Maybe so, but it's not the best explanation of grammar on an English forum. A lot of grammatical combinations of words sound wrong to some people, and a lot of ungrammatical ones sound right to others.

CJ

anonymousWhat is the proper spelling of the following?
Varsity Boys Basketball
or
Varsity Boys' Basketball
Do I need an apostrophe?
Thank you in advance for your help.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

We say "women's tennis", not "women tennis". The apostrophe is called for.