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If I wrote "Usenet groups are very useful: for example, ... same reason, I believe a comma is appropriate following "e.g."

I remember reading somewhere that "e.g." should always be followed by a colon. I also remember thinking "What a load of nonsense."

Save the colon for "viz", say I.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Just because the writer knows the meanings of these two ... decide the document is not useful or trustworthy. Use English!

Many do but, pace Bournemouth Council, it still has its uses.

Yet, Shirley, ceterius paribus, English will be clearer.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
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Just because the writer knows the meanings of these two ... decide the document is not useful or trustworthy. Use English!

Many people know no Latin, but they still know what 'eg' and 'ie' mean. Some, of course, don't.

Andrew
http://www.wordskit.com /
http://www.flayme.com /
"If A is success in life, then A = x + y + z.
Work is x; y is play; and z is keeping your mouth shut." ~ Albert Einstein
Many people know no Latin, but they still know what 'eg' and 'ie' mean. Some, of course, don't.

The Oxford dictionaries have joined the modern British trend of dropping the dots from many abbreviations, but even they know that the abbreviations "e.g." and "i.e." are written thus. I doubt that even Andrew Heenan "knows" what 'eg' and 'ie' mean, since they mean nothing at all. "IE" (written without the dots and upper case) does mean something, but Andrew Heenan probably doesn't know what that meaining is either.
Many people know no Latin, but they still know what 'eg' and 'ie' mean. Some, of course, don't.

The Oxford dictionaries have joined the modern British trend of dropping the dots from many abbreviations, but even they know ... without the dots and upper case) does mean something, but Andrew Heenan probably doesn't know what that meaining is either.

A technical magazine (in which, many years ago, I had one or two articles published) had a rigid editorial policy to ensure consistency. All potential authors were urged to submit material in the approved format. Very little escaped the eagle eye of the technical editor.

As well as using standard symbols in diagrams, the rule for text included not having unnecessary capitalisation of abbreviations of ordinary words, especially where there could be no doubt that it was an abbreviation. For example, it was always 'tv set' and never 'TV set').

Also, there was no unnecessary punctuation. There were no full stops between the letters of an abbreviation, except to avoid confusion. For example, you would write 'eg', 'ie', (and without any following comma). A typical exception would be 'i.f.' (for 'intermediate frequency') which, being (of course) lower case, could otherwise be read as the word 'if'.

Ian
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The Oxford dictionaries have joined the modern British trend of dropping the dots from many abbreviations, but even they know ... without the dots and upper case) does mean something, but Andrew Heenan probably doesn't know what that meaining is either.

What a twat.
I see ie, eg, EG, IE and many others; I know exactly what they mean. At least, I've met one where I didn't. IE, for example, may refer to 'that is', nternet explorer, or several other possibilities. Context is all.
If you don't, then you must have locked yourself away for many years. Language is a living thing. Grow up! Nuff Said.

Andrew
http://www.wordskit.com /
http://www.flayme.com /
"If A is success in life, then A = x + y + z.
Work is x; y is play; and z is keeping your mouth shut." ~ Albert Einstein
The Oxford dictionaries have joined the modern British trend of ... Andrew Heenan probably doesn't know what that meaining is either.

What a twat. I see ie, eg, EG, IE and many others; I know exactly what they mean. At least, ... don't, then you must have locked yourself away for many years. Language is a living thing. Grow up! Nuff Said.

Is Nuff Said some Arab fellow?
Conventions carry meaning, like it or not. "Advice" and "advise" mean different things, as, you seem to realize, do "i.e." and "IE". If Brother Martin adheres tightly to convention, that's preferable to treating convention so loosely that the reader loses track of what's being conveyed or, if you're lucky, merely has to pause to figure things out.
Sure, language changes. No one this side of D. Hencer Spines would deny that. But the disorder of the leading edge of change, which includes the flouting of convention, can be disruptive. ("Creative destruction" belongs to economics, not language.) I subscribe to Aristotle's Golden Mean moderation at all costs. Let others do the disrupting.
I've seen all sorts of variations on e.g. and i.e., but I stick to lower case with dots. And I precede and follow them with commas. That's how it useta to be done, back when people actually cared about such things, and I find that it causes the least disruption.

Bob Lieblich
Run over in the middle of the road
I've seen all sorts of variations on e.g. and i.e., but I stick to lower case with dots. And I ... to be done, back when people actually cared about such things, and I find that it causes the least disruption.

OK, we agree on those points. How about using them outside parentheses?
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I've seen all sorts of variations on e.g. and i.e., ... things, and I find that it causes the least disruption.

OK, we agree on those points. How about using them outside parentheses?

Why not?
It may be that professional bias enters in here. In the US, at least, the legal profession uses i.e. and e.g. unapologetically, and in regular text as well as forms of citation. A sentence like "Many American states have right-to-work laws, e.g., Texas, Florida, North Carolina." (I have no idea whether the statement is factually true.) But I'm pretty sure that I've done the same sort of thing in Usenet postings and e-mail as well as in legal writing.
Americans do have a tendency to confuse the two, primarily by using i.e. where e.g. is needed. That might be a good reason to surrender and switch to "that is" and "for example." I'm agnostic on that issue.

Bob Lieblich
Note the second and third letters of my surname
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