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The first thing that comes to my non-English speaker's mind when seeing "IE" is Internet Explorer.

My English-speaker's mind reacts the same way.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
IR means something to an electrical engineer, but what does IE, by itself, mean?

Isn't it Japanese for "NO"?
Cheers,
Daniel.
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IR means something to an electrical engineer, but what does ... the current wave and the voltage wave in the circuit.

It would be unusual to put 'W=IE'. Instead, 'W=IV' (or 'VI'). 'E' is normally the EMF - the 'electromotive force' (the open-circuit voltage) - so there ain't no 'I'. As I always use lower case (normally without the dots) I have never had a problem!

Engineers use lower case if the I or the E is alternating current or voltage. No engineer I've ever known writes W=IE, but many people write P=IE, engineers and non-technical people alike.
Regards,
Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
The Oxford dictionaries have joined the modern British trend of ... Andrew Heenan probably doesn't know what that meaining is either.

IR means something to an electrical engineer, but what does IE, by itself, mean? W = IE is useful, but ... across the device and theta is the phase difference between the current wave and the voltage wave in the circuit.

The cononical letter is phi, as in P = V I cos(phi)

Jan
I know that: i.e. = That is e.g. = For example I have two questions about their use: 1. Should ... "that is" and "for example" in the main body of a document and only use i.e. and e.g. inside parentheses.

I haven't had time to read much of the thread, so I haven't considered all aspects of this, but rather than stay silent (me?) I think that you make a good suggestion.
I think the use of those two abbreviations often looks pretentious, especially when people use the wrong one and plainly don't know what they mean. There is little or no reason not to use real English words in most cases. We're not short of space, and we're not medieval writers writing footnotes.
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IR means something to an electrical engineer, but what does IE, by itself, mean?

Isn't it Japanese for "NO"?

Hi, although more strictly, "ie" is "household" in Japanese, according to Wiki, with "iee" being "no".

Regards,
Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
IR means something to an electrical engineer, but what does IE, by itself, mean?

Isn't it Japanese for "NO"?

Hi, although more strictly, "ie" is "household" in Japanese, according to Wiki, with "iee" being "no".
Correction: Japanese "Hi", for English "yes", is usually spelled "Hai", according to Wiki.

Regards,
Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
The Oxford dictionaries have joined the modern British trend of ... Andrew Heenan probably doesn't know what that meaining is either.

IR means something to an electrical engineer, but what does IE, by itself, mean?

Back when I was at Stanford, IE was "Industrial Engineering", a department (technically "Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management", but typically just "IE") in the School of Engineering, described as being "concerned with how best to organize people, information, money, and materials to produce and distribute services and products". Looking at the current web site, the department merged with the departments of Operations Research ("OR") and Engineering Economic Systems ("EES") to form the Department of Management Science and Engineering.
To others, of course, it would be "Internet Explorer", "Indo-European" or even, perhaps, "Ireland".

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(about various possible meanings of "IE")
To others, of course, it would be "Internet Explorer", "Indo-European" or even, perhaps, "Ireland".

IE=W; i e, Amps times volts equals watts; e g, if you have a 100-watt bulb connected to a 120-volt power source, then I=W/E or about 0.83 amps.

Bob Cunningham, Southern California, USA. Western American English