I know that:
i.e. = That is
e.g. = For example
I have two questions about their use:
1. Should a comma be placed after i.e. and e.g.? I believe the answer is Yes.
2. Is is proper to use them outside parenthetical phrases? I believe youshould write out "that is" and "for example" in the main body of a document and only use i.e. and e.g. inside parentheses.
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i.e. = That is e.g. = For example 1. Should a comma be placed after i.e. and e.g.? I believe ... "that is" and "for example" in the main body of a document and only use i.e. and e.g. inside parentheses.

What gave you those ideas?
I can see that a comma after i.e. would not be out of place, but I don't see that it's vital.
I don't see the point of a comma after 'e.g.', in fact I'd suggest a colon if anything. but it seems OK without dressing.
I've never heard that parentheses should make a difference, and see no reason why they should. I'd hesitate to use abbreviations in some documents (love letters, for example), but I don''t see that brackets would affect anything at all.
Interesting question;all new to me!

Andrew
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Work is x; y is play; and z is keeping your mouth shut." ~ Albert Einstein
I can see that a comma after i.e. would not be out of place, but I don't see that it's vital. I don't see the point of a comma after 'e.g.', in fact I'd suggest a colon if anything. but it seems OK without dressing.

If I wrote "Usenet groups are very useful: for example, you can get help with English grammar." I believe it would be correct to put a comma after "for example". For the same reason, I believe a comma is appropriate following "e.g."
I've never heard that parentheses should make a difference, and see no reason why they should. I'd hesitate to use abbreviations in some documents (love letters, for example), but I don''t see that brackets would affect anything at all.

95% of the time that I see "i.e." or "e.g." they are inside parentheses. I see "for example" often outside of parentheses but rarely e.g.

I would write: "Some equations are simple: for example, F=***, D=***." But I would say "Some dress colors (e.g., black) are more appropriate for formal occasions than others."
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I know that: i.e. = That is e.g. = For example I have two questions about their use: 1. Should ... "that is" and "for example" in the main body of a document and only use i.e. and e.g. inside parentheses.

That depends on the house style of the publication.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/stevesig.htm
Blog: http://methodius.blogspot.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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I know that: i.e. = That is e.g. = For example I have two questions about their use: 1. Should a comma be placed after i.e. and e.g.? I believe the answer is Yes.

Generally the comma goes before (and after) the whole phrase including the abbreviations. But the real answer is you should not uses these abbreviations at all in modern writing. Many scholarly publications discourage their use. These once-scholarly abbreviation escaped into general use long ago and are even found in common speech, so be prepared to be tolerent of others who use them.
2. Is is proper to use them outside parenthetical phrases? I believe you should write out "that is" and "for example" in the main body of a document and only use i.e. and e.g. inside parentheses.

You should write out the English equivalents in all contexts.

Lars Eighner (Email Removed) Think like a man of action. Act like a man of thought. Henri Bergson
But the real answer is you should not uses these abbreviations at all in modern writing. Many scholarly publications discourage ... long ago and are even found in common speech, so be prepared to be tolerent of others who use them.

Just because a phrase has "escaped into general use" does not mean it should not be used.
You should write out the English equivalents in all contexts.

So you would say "Some presidents (for example, Roosevelt) are known for leading during times of war." I think "(e.g., Roosevelt)" is quite acceptable.
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If I wrote "Usenet groups are very useful: for example, you can get help with English grammar." I believe it would be correct to put a comma after "for example". For the same reason, I believe a comma is appropriate following "e.g."

Sure, but that's normal sentence structure, not 'eg' specific. What's wrong with "People should avoid infectious diseases, e.g. mumps, measles and chicken pox."
95% of the time that I see "i.e." or "e.g." they are inside parentheses. I see "for example" often outside ... example, F=***, D=***." But I would say "Some dress colors (e.g., black) are more appropriate for formal occasions than others."

As for the parentheses, I am not disputing your experience, but I'm not sure that it should necessarily be the basis for a rule of grammar.

Andrew
"When 'Do no Evil' has been understood, then learn the harder, braver rule, Do Good." ~ Arthur Guiterman
I can see that a comma after i.e. would not ... a colon if anything. but it seems OK without dressing.

If I wrote "Usenet groups are very useful: for example, you can get help with English grammar." I believe it would be correct to put a comma after "for example". For the same reason, I believe a comma is appropriate following "e.g."

I remember reading somewhere that "e.g." should always be followed by a colon. I also remember thinking "What a load of nonsense."
Rob Bannister
Just because the writer knows the meanings of these two abbreviations does not guarantee that the reader will. Many consider use of Latin to be elitist and are irritated by it; they decide the document is not useful or trustworthy. Use English!

Many do but, pace Bournemouth Council, it still has its uses.
Waterways route planning website: http://canalplan.org.uk
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