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When do you decide which to use: Miss, Ms. or Mrs.

Thank you.
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Miss = unmarried lady

Mrs. = married lady (husband could be alive or not)

Ms. = either one [this one appeared during the women's lib movement of the 70's, which declared that it shouldn't make any difference if a lady is married or not, as it didn't matter if a man was married or not (only Mr.)]
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After searching the internet I can't seem to find anything definitive that explains if it's proper to use Mrs. with a maiden name in a culture that never changes names because of marriage.-- There is nothing 'wrong' with deciding to do whatever your culture suggests, but doing so may cause your communication in English to fail miserably. Introducing Mr Lee and Mrs Kim as a couple to me will make me wonder what adultery is going on.
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English Major:

Miss. - single women
Mrs. - married women
Ms. - used when uncertain of status as not to offend.
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This subject received extensive coverage here: Ms, Mrs, Miss
 Philip's reply was promoted to an answer.
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I am a widow and want to know which is correct to use
As a widow, you can choose to be Mrs. Charles Smith or Mrs. Mary Smith or Ms. Mary Smith.

My condolences.
Thank you! Very helpful.
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In Korea, women do not change their names when getting married. They continue to use their maiden names all of their lives. So, it seems proper to me to address a Korean woman as "Ms. Kim", "Ms. Park" etc. rather than using "Mrs."

To me, it seems wrong to introduce a husband and wife as "Mr. Lee and Mrs. Kim". Yet, other English speakers I meet here say they don't see anything wrong with it. After searching the internet I can't seem to find anything definitive that explains if it's proper to use Mrs. with a maiden name in a culture that never changes names because of marriage.
 Mister Micawber's reply was promoted to an answer.
Hi,

Have you had a chance to actually ask some Korean women how they prefer to be introduced in English?

Also, please note this.
In my experience, it is unusual today to introduce someone as eg Mrs Smith. Instead, it is usually eg 'Mary Smith'. The use only of title plus surname in an introduction seems very awkward and stuffy, unless there are special circumstances, eg an introduction of an adult to a child.
However, I realize that this depends very much on the culture involved, and I know that Korean culture is very different, eg with regard to the relative ages of two adults who are being introduced.

Clive
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