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1. Does "prostrates herself in front of the camera" in the text below mean "puts herself in front of the camera"?


2. Does "borrowing fetishistic tropes that covet the notion of female self-fetishisation" mean "representing fetishistic metaphors that convey the notion of self-fetishisation"?


3. Does "divert it from being for a male surveyor" mean "but change this female self-fetishisation so that it will not target a male viewer any more"?


4. Does "in the use of" mean "she does it (diverting the notion of female self-fetishisation from being for a male surveyor) through the use of ..."?


Text:

In Cahun’s series Autoportraits, the artist prostrates herself in front of the camera in a variety of guises and genders, borrowing fetishistic tropes that covet the notion of female self-fetishisation but divert it from being for a male surveyor in the use of props and accoutrements that rearticulate her body in a proliferation of moves and poses.

Comments  
catttt1. Does "prostrates herself in front of the camera" in the text below mean "puts herself in front of the camera"?

I can't see her photographs, but to prostrate oneself is to grovel by lying face down, like a slave before an emperor. It is most often used figuratively as an exaggeration. I suspect that the artist was simply lying down in a variety of undignified poses.

catttt2. Does "borrowing fetishistic tropes that covet the notion of female self-fetishisation" mean "representing fetishistic metaphors that convey the notion of self-fetishisation"?

I don't see how tropes can covet a notion. I'm sure it is because I am not conversant in the jargon being used, but that sounds like nonsense to me.

catttt3. Does "divert it from being for a male surveyor" mean "but change this female self-fetishisation so that it will not target a male viewer any more"?

I believe so.

catttt4. Does "in the use of" mean "she does it (diverting the notion of female self-fetishisation from being for a male surveyor) through the use of ..."?

Yes.