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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/19/business/economy/19grads.html
"Now evidence is emerging that the damage wrought by the sour economy is more widespread than just a few careers led astray or postponed. Even for college graduates — the people who were most protected from the slings and arrows of recession— the outlook is rather bleak. "

http://www.nytimes.com/1991/12/07/us/americans-aren-t-being-protected-against-tuberculosis-panel-...

"Americans are not being adequately protected against tuberculosis, and infected patients are not being given optimal treatment, a national panel of experts concluded today after a two-day meeting here."

Are there subtle differences between "protected from" and "protected against"?
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SheltieBitesAre there subtle differences between "protected from" and "protected against"?
Not that I can see.

You could have protected against the slings and arrows of recession and protected from tuberculosis, and it wouldn't change the meaning at all.

CJ
Hi,

I think you might try to find subtle differences, but in most contexts there would be no real difference.

I'd expect 'from' to be more common.

Clive
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Thanks CalifJim & Clive.
Would the same non-difference rule apply to "defend from/against" and:

"He was the savior against/from the evil enemies."
"He was the protector against/from the evil enemies."
"He was the defender against/from the evil enemies."
?
Hi,

Would the same non-difference rule apply to "defend from/against" and:

"He was the savior against/from the evil enemies."
"He was the protector against/from the evil enemies."
"He was the defender against/from the evil enemies."

Yes, very broadly speaking, but all of these sound a bit odd and unusual without more context.

Clive
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SheltieBitesWould the same non-difference rule apply to "defend from/against"
Yes.
SheltieBites"
"He was the savior against/from the evil enemies."
"He was the protector against/from the evil enemies."
"He was the defender against/from the evil enemies."
They all need "a", not "the".

a savior - Neither works.
a protector - Both possible.
a defender - Both possible.

None of these are commonly said. They are not idiomatic. You would say

He saved us from ... (not against)
He protected us against/from (usually from)
He defended us against/from (usually from)

CJ
Thanks Clive.
Thanks CJ.
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