Would like help with a sentence construction as I'm unsure about the "rule" that says prepositions should not be used to end a sentence.

We work to create a school we can all be proud of.

We work to create a school of which we can be proud.

I would go for the first sentence, but would like to hear other perspectives on usage.
thanks,
Ching
Would like help with a sentence construction as I'm unsure about the "rule" that says prepositions should not be used to end a sentence.

The "rule" was made up by pedantic grammarians in the 18th century (if I recall corectly)
We work to create a school we can all be proud of.

This is acceptable modern English.
We work to create a school of which we can be proud.

This sounds very formal and a bit old-fashioned.
I would go for the first sentence, but would like to hear other perspectives on usage.

Both sentences are grammatically correct.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
I, too, would go for the first sentence. However, to avoid the rule all together, I'd rewrite the sentence. I'd probably write:

We work to create a school that gives us pride.
Good luck with your choice!
Carolyn
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I, too, would go for the first sentence. However, to avoid the rule all together, I'd rewrite the sentence. I'd probably write: We work to create a school that gives us pride.

You manage to avoid the rule, but the resulting sentnce sounds a bit clunky and unidiomatic.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan