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" It may prove in the future that neither falls short of evidence or that some synthesis of the two theories is plausible. "

It is a formal subject, not a demonstrative pronoun.


The verb, prove can be used in the sentence as a complete intransitive verb ??

As far as know, the verb, prove is an incomplete intransitive verb and needs a complement in the sentence.

Am I wrong??

So, my question is the above sentence is correct??

Pls let me know.

Thanks
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The clause ('that...plausible') is a notional subject, but it is not the grammatical subject; it is the verb complement.
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Hi,
Although you give no context, it doesn't seem natural to say that a theory falls (or does not fall) short of evidence. Perhaps you should say it another way.

Best wishes, Clive
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Comments  
Hi,

Thanks for your explanation.

But I don't understand it exactly.

Can you give me more detailed explanation please ??

Thanks

Terry
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On reexamining your sentence, I agree with your original assessment. If it is constructed correctly, then 'it' must be a pronoun referring to something previously mentioned. Otherwise, I suspect that the writer chose the wrong voice:

It may be proven in the future that neither falls short of evidence or that some synthesis of the two theories is plausible.
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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.