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Hi, ..I understand that if provide is followed by an indirect object, followed by a direct one, the latter is preceeded with with, as in:


"We should provide learners of new concepts with actual models to bridge to reality"

Is that always the case? And is the following correct?

".. provide me a way out of this mess!"


I appreciate your help. Thank you.

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SurferI understand that if provide is followed by an indirect object, ...

Both grammatical patterns are used as you can see from the examples below. The pattern that includes 'with' is used a bit more often than the pattern without it.

What you are calling an indirect object is only an indirect object in the pattern without 'with'. It's considered a direct object in the pattern with 'with'. Direct objects do not occur after prepositions.

A trip to his Korean homeland could provide him some answers about his identity.
When his case came to trial, he asked the court to provide him an attorney.
The quasars provide him a view on the history of the universe.

They will provide him with the psychological support he needs.
His savings may be able to provide him with about one fifth of his income.
Each American requires at least 0.4 acres of prime farm land to provide him with a decent balanced diet.

CJ

Comments  
Surfer".. provide me a way out of this mess!"

That is perfectly fine, even preferable to "with a way out of". "With" becomes necessary only in passive constructions like "They were provided with weapons for the upcoming revolution." "With" is often advisable to prevent misreading, as in your first sentence, "We should provide learners of new concepts actual models to bridge to reality." "New concepts actual models" is a bit tricky to read.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thank you, CJ.

CalifJimWhat you are calling an indirect object is only an indirect object in the pattern without 'with'. It's considered a direct object in the pattern with 'with'. Direct objects do not occur after prepositions.

I thought it was bizarre too, but I read, understood to be precise, it on this site:

https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/everyday-grammar-prepositions-provide/2701412.html

, I quote:

"Here is an example sentence, written by U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama: “Room to Read provides girls with scholarships that cover the cost of housing, food, and books.”

In this sentence, “girls” is the indirect object and “scholarships” is the direct object."

Thank you, "anonymous".

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Surfer“scholarships” is the direct object.

Oof! People will put anything online these days.

Maybe they think "provide with" is a phrasal verb of some kind? Emotion: shake

Or maybe they've been studying too much Latin grammar? Emotion: smile

CJ

CalifJimOof! People will put anything online these days.

Tell me about it!

I guess it's a good thing the net effect is the same (same form) regardless of how words are termed!


Appreciated, thanks.