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hey

I'm wondering since pseudo passive is made up of non transitive verbs and the verb works as an adjective for pseudo passive, so is it correct to say that if a non transitive verb is used as past participle it would always work as an adjective.

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anonymous

hey

im wondering since pseudo passive is made up of non transitive verbs and the verb works as an adjective for pseudo passive, so is it correct to say that if a non transitive verb is used as past participle it would always work as an adjective.

The pseudo-passive is made up of intransitive verbs, and the verb functions as an adjective, so does the past participle of an intransitive verb always function as an adjective?

I recast your question so it's easier to understand.

1) Where do get the idea that a pseudo-passive consists of intransitive verbs?

The problem is complicated is a pseudo-passive. be (is) is intransitive, but complicate (complicated) is not.

2) You mention verbs. Then you say the verb (one) functions as an adjective. Where did the other verb(s) go?

3) No, the past participle of an intransitive verb does not always function as an adjective. Some of them never function as adjectives. Here are some intransitive verbs and their past participles followed by impossible sentences in which the writer tried to use the past participle as an adjective.

be - been ?He seemed been.
occur - occurred ?It was occurred.
remain - remained ?They have been remained.

CJ

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anonymousI'm wondering since pseudo passive is made up of non transitive verbs and the verb works as an adjective for pseudo passive, so is it correct to say that if a non transitive verb is used as past participle it would always work as an adjective.

It's true that adjectival passives (your pseudo-passives) use adjectives formed from past participles, and it's also true that they are complex-intransitive clauses (S-V-PC). But it's not the case that all past participles are always adjectives. Many of them function as verbs, as in She has written another novel; I could have you dismissed on the spot, where "written" and "dismissed" are verbs, not adjectives.

Many of them can be both verbs and adjectives:

The window was deliberately broken by the thieves. [past participle form of verb]

It didn't look broken to me. [past-participial adjective]


Incidentally, in my experience the term 'pseudo-passive' applies to clauses like This bed has been slept in, with a stranded preposition (also known as prepositional passives).

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Hey thanks


Pseudo passive basically means passive voice structure with active meaning. Correct?

He seems broken, canvas is painted

Broken and painted are Adjectives thus these are pseudo passive.


' i got this idea that pseudo passive uses intransitive verb from the definition: psuedo passive has active voice meaning or no active equivalent so that implies verb has no object' "isn't this same as active voice with no passive possible"

Eg. He jumps: passive is not possible as no object' is required.

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anonymousPseudo passive basically means passive voice structure with active meaning. Correct?

No, no, no! It may seem that way, but it's the wrong way to look at it. It's not a passive voice structure. It only appears that way.

A pseudo passive (as the term is used by Palmer) is a sentence of the form

SUBJECT - LINKING VERB - ADJECTIVE

where the adjective is identical in form to a past participle. (It's an active voice sentence with no corresponding passive form.)

Fiona is happy.
Fiona is surprised.

It's the same structure either way. The final adjective cannot be seen as a past participle in the first sentence. In the second, it can; but it's an adjective.

So a pseudo passive (i.e., false passive) is not passive at all. It is an active sentence masquerading as passive because the adjective at the end looks like a verb.

anonymouspsuedo passive has active voice meaning or no active equivalent so that implies verb has no object'

I've never heard such a definition of the term "pseudo passive". I'm puzzled as to what it even means.

anonymousHe jumps: passive is not possible as no object' is required.
as no object is present in the active form seen here.

I think you may be misreading something in your grammar books.

This part here about "He jumps" has nothing to do with pseudo passives. It's a completely different topic.

CJ

anonymous

Pseudo passive basically means passive voice structure with active meaning. Correct? He seems broken, canvas is painted Broken and painted are Adjectives thus these are pseudo passive.

i got this idea that pseudo passive uses intransitive verb from the definition: psuedo passive has active voice meaning or no active equivalent so that implies verb has no object' "isn't this same as active voice with no passive possible"

Eg. He jumps: passive is not possible as no object' is required.


Consider this pair:

[1] They were very worried. [adjectival passive]

[2] The window was broken by the thieves. [verbal passive]

The crucial point is that adjectival passives (your pseudo-passives) are not true passives at all. They are only passive in a derivative sense: they belong to the complex-intransitive construction. In that respect, adjectival passives are like verbal passives in that they are intransitive.

The term 'adjectival passive' applies only to the predicative complement, i.e. to the adjective phrase "very worried".

Hi, thanks

I now know what psuedo passive is but sometimes I m not able to get if verb is telling about an action or quality. What should I do then, is there a rule to identify it if one can't understand it by meaning


Please tell about the types of passives, difference between psuedo and statal passives



If have/has/had been or to be is used in a sentence and past participle is telling about the subject(adjective) wouldn't that surely mean that it's a passive sentence



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Please find attached (verb or adjective) (what voice is this)



Similarly i have confusion if verb ing is present participle/Gerund or progressive verb,

It is recommended if linking verb+ main verbing is used it shows an action else it works as Gerund or present participle buy this does not seem to hold true for the following

What is the meaning