Have any of you seen this TV commercial for Fed-Ex-Kinkos in the US? The customer, a native speaker of American English, says he wants to ship his package to (puh-HO-nix), inaread of "Phoenix" (the capital of Arizona).

Like, what is the point of this? Would anyone actually pronounce it this way? Is this commercial based on linguistic reality?
 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 18
Julie P. wrote on 17 Dec 2004:
Have any of you seen this TV commercial for Fed-Ex-Kinkos in the US? The customer, a native speaker of American ... what is the point of this? Would anyone actually pronounce it this way? Is this commercial based on linguistic reality?

Yes. As one of our more literate posters mentioned yesterday in this forum, all native speakers of English have anywhere from dozens to hundreds of words that they have read but have never pronounced. Not everyone knows how to pronounce Fee-nix (Fee-nicks?; Fee-nick's?), much less spell it.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Julie P. wrote on 17 Dec 2004:

Have any of you seen this TV commercial for Fed-Ex-Kinkos ... wants to ship his package to (puh-HO-nix), inaread of "Phoenix"

that should have been "instead", not "inaread", above!
(the capital of Arizona). Like, what is the point of this? Would anyone actually pronounce it this way? Is this commercial based on linguistic reality?

Yes. As one of our more literate posters mentioned yesterday in this forum, all native speakers of English have anywhere ... they have read but have never pronounced. Not everyone knows how to pronounce Fee-nix (Fee-nicks?; Fee-nick's?), much less spell it.

Thanks. But doesn't everyone know that "ph" in English is pronounced as (f)? I can understand not knowing where to place stress, but (puh-HO-nix) is bizarre, something no native speaker would produce.

Also, when I was in high school, I thought "epitome" was pronounced (E-pi-tohm)!!
And did you know people in my area pronounce "radiator" so that it rhymes with "gladiator"?!
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Have any of you seen this TV commercial for Fed-Ex-Kinkos in the US? The customer, a native speaker of American ... what is the point of this? Would anyone actually pronounce it this way? Is this commercial based on linguistic reality?

The object of any commercial is to get your attention and get you to retain the name of the product. This one obviously succeeded in your case. One of the ways to get your attention and get you retain the name of the product is humor. It's no more complicated than that.
Julie P. wrote on 17 Dec 2004:

Have any of you seen this TV commercial for Fed-Ex-Kinkos ... it this way? Is this commercial based on linguistic reality?

Yes. As one of our more literate posters mentioned yesterday in this forum, all native speakers of English have anywhere ... they have read but have never pronounced. Not everyone knows how to pronounce Fee-nix (Fee-nicks?; Fee-nick's?), much less spell it.

Come on...no native speaker of English would pronounce a word beginning with "ph" as "puh-H...".
Far more likely that it's being done for humorous effect.
Have any of you seen this TV commercial for Fed-Ex-Kinkos ... it this way? Is this commercial based on linguistic reality?

The object of any commercial is to get your attention and get you to retain the name of the product. ... get your attention and get you retain the name of the product is humor. It's no more complicated than that.

Thanks. I just expected there would have been more outrage from the linguistics community. But they did succeed in getting my attention, as you pointed out. The guy was so outrageous in his pronunciation, I couldn't help but notice!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Also, when I was in high school, I thought "epitome" was pronounced (E-pi-tohm)!!

A friend of mine who grew up in Philadelphia thought Yosemite was pronounced YOHZ-might until he heard me pronounce it. And he was in his early twenties at the time!
Another well-educated friend thought egregious was pronounced e-GREG- ghee-us until he heard me use the word.

Dena Jo
Email goes to denajo2 at the dot com variation of the Yahoo domain.

Plonk the bastards: http://www.schmuckwithanunderwood.com/trolls.html
Have any of you seen this TV commercial for Fed-Ex-Kinkos in the US? The customer, a native speaker of American ... what is the point of this? Would anyone actually pronounce it this way? Is this commercial based on linguistic reality?

Two probable answers:

1. Some subtle advertiser wants the reinforcementof the half-recognized error (e.g. Winston tastes
good like a cigaret should.)

2. Same reason as Dr. Johnson gave for callinga pastern a horse's knee.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Also, when I was in high school, I thought "epitome" was pronounced (E-pi-tohm)!!

A friend of mine who grew up in Philadelphia thought Yosemite was pronounced YOHZ-might until he heard me pronounce it. ... twenties at the time! Another well-educated friend thought egregious was pronounced e-GREG- ghee-us until he heard me use the word.

Wow. This reminds me: there is this road where I live called "Godshall Road", but I do not know how to parse this:
Gods-hall
or
God-shall
And I thought "endicia" was pronounced (en-duh-SEE-uh), until recently, since I studied Romance languages in high school, and tend to pronounce words where the origin is obvious as the Romans and their descendents would have.
For example, there was this work supervisor whose last name was "Daigneau". I pronounced it (dayn-yoh), knowing French, but my boss quickly and arrogantly corrected me, saying it was pronounced (dayn-yoo). Sigh ... if she only had a clue.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more