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Yes probably for pullover, and the original phrase is bull and bear, referring to markets, bull meaning markets going up and bear, going down. Cf. http://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/129.asp
Amazingly interesting post.

To be sincere I thought it meant: pull the clothes from the shelves and just go (bear). Something like "lo coges y te lo llevas".
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This is my point of view. Pull and Bear per se make no sense, but it has subtle and wise connection with the term "Bull and Bear" applied to the stock market. Bull and Bear are strategies for selling and buying securities, and they reflect TRENDS (trends in the optimism/pessimism of the market). But still it represents a TREND (fashion trends...)
Also, the verb "pull" is used in english not only as pull to open doors, but pull is also a noun (a strong pull on the coat, for example) and "bear" can be used related to clothes as well( to express the resistence/resilience of a particular tissue maybe).
Pull can have here the meaning of ''to extract", "to snatch"(clothes)- suggesting that you like very much the clothes and you are buying a lot from the shop and Bear can stand for "to have". You like the clothes, you "extract" them from the shop and then you wear them . Just an inkling of what the meaning could be. :-?
I know that the name comes from two streets .... these streets were intersecting right near this company...
Guess what? The name of one of the street was pull and the other was bear....
AnonymousPull can have here the meaning of ''to extract", "to snatch"(clothes)- suggesting that you like very much the clothes and you are buying a lot from the shop and Bear can stand for "to have". You like the clothes, you "extract" them from the shop and then you wear them . Just an inkling of what the meaning could be. :-?
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Pull and Bear are two verbs.
Just take a look at a good dictionary and you will discover a lot of possible definitions.
Probably, the company name have been deliberately choosed to have a wide range of meanings.

I like to think about the hands on a Royal Navy Ship pulling a rope and bearing the load.
how about pull and bear as a distortion of pullover?
Gman: PULL it (a t-shirt) from the shelf; AND BEAR it or carry, or wear it... that's how I understood it
Einmalige Narizsse himaybe it's silly, but i was wondering if i should translate "pull and bear" as a two words or one phrase (together).is it some kind of idiom? i haven't found anything like "pull and bear" (together), but would it make any sense if i translate it "severally"?any idea?
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Yes, you're right but I figured out that Pull & Bear means something like Take it and Carry it. Something like giving the idea of easy shopping. I'm from Barcelona and I alway thought that was a rather funny name until I got into this translation.
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