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He took a deep breath to gather his courage, then pulled it open


Pulled (verb) + it (object) + open (object complement)


I want to know if 'open' is an adjective or an intransitive verb because both adjective and intransitive verb can be object complement.

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He took a deep breath to gather his courage, then pulled it open.


"Open" is an adjective, here serving as objective predicative complement.

Note that only NPs and AdjPs can be object complements, but not verbs.

Comments  
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BillJNote that only NPs and AdjPs can be object complements, but not verbs.

Thanks BillJ

But, what about this?


ex) I made them repair my computer

In this sentence, made(causative verb) + them(object) + repair (verb??)

Do we have to see 'repair' as infinitive, not verb?

HoonyBut, what about this? ex) "I made them repair my computer". In this sentence, "made" (causative verb) + "them" (object) + "repair" (verb??)

"Them" is the direct object of "made", but the infinitival clause "repair my computer" is not an object complement.

The causative verb "made" is a catenative verb, and "repair my computer" is its catenative complement.

As I said, objective complements are restricted to NPs and AdjPs.

The word "catenative" comes from the Latin word for "chain", which is appropriate here since "made" and "repair" do indeed form a chain of verbs with only the NP "them" intervening between them.

BillJ"Them" is the direct object of "made", but the infinitival clause "repair my computer" is not an object complement.The causative verb "made" is a catenative verb, and "repair my computer" is its catenative complement.As I said, objective complements are restricted to NPs and AdjPs.The word "catenative" comes from the Latin word for "chain", which is appropriate here since "made" and "repair" do indeed form a chain of verbs with only the NP "them" intervening between them.

Thank you for your comment, but I haven't understood your explanation about catenative verb..


Are these verbs also catenative verbs?

1) I saw my mom cooking

2) I helped him (to) prepare for the exam

3) I had her go to school

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HoonyAre these verbs also catenative verbs?1) I saw my mom cooking2) I helped him (to) prepare for the exam3) I had her go to school.

Yes, those verbs are catenatives ones. The non-finite clauses that function as their complement are their catenative complements.

The intervening NPs "my mom", "him" and "her" are syntactically the direct objects of their respective verb, and the understood subject of the subordinate clauses.

BillJ

He took a deep breath to gather his courage, then pulled it open.


"Open" is an adjective, here serving as objective predicative complement.

Note that only NPs and AdjPs can be object complements, but not verbs.

It's very complicated....

As I get your comment, I've had a question

In the sentence "I pulled it open", why is a verb "pull' not a catenative verb?

If we see 'open' as a verb, 'it open' could be a catenative complement?

HoonyAs I get your comment, I've had a questionIn the sentence "I pulled it open", why is a verb "pull' not a catenative verb?If we see 'open' as a verb, 'it open' could be a catenative complement?

No, for two reasons: first, "pull" does not take non-finite clauses as complement, so it can't be a catenative verb, and second, this "open" is not a verb but an adjective that describes the state of the referent of "it".

Compare also: The door/window was open.

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