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Dear teachers,

A/ 1) Can we use punctuation signals within dashes? e.g.
“I have always been fond of reading this comes from my mother ; /, she was a storyteller.”

2) Or should the information written between dashes be formed of a single clause only? e.g. “I have always been fond of reading this comes from my mother who was a storyteller.”

B/ How should I spell the following ?
“literature” takes one “t” in English, but two “t’s” / “ts” (?) in French.”

Thank you,
Hela
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I'd say you may have commas between dashes:

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13. The four greatest names in English literature are almost the
first we come to,--Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and
Milton
.--B. (Omit the comma before the dash)

H.W. Fowler, The King's English, 2nd ed. 1908.
http://www.bartleby.com/116/404.html
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I'd agree with MM on the clutter quotient.

In example A, the part after the dash seems like an aside, so it might do better in parentheses.

MrP
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Comments  
A is an interesting one, Hela. Dashes are presumably casual colons, and I find the same problem with both of them. If it looks too awkward or unclear, I recast as an unpunctuated clause.

B-- This is one of the special cases in which you are permitted to use an apostrophe to make a plural; it seems evident that ts would be taken at face value otherwise (as in tsetse fly). Personally, I would say the t is doubled in French, and avoid the awkward formation.
That's a very good advice, Mr Micawber! Emotion: big smile
 Marius Hancu's reply was promoted to an answer.
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 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.